Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This may be an ignorant question, but I'm unsure why I can not use namespace aliasing and extension methods together.

The following example works just fine:

Program.cs

using System;
using ExtensionMethodTest.Domain;

namespace ExtensionMethodTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var m = new Domain.MyClass();
            var result = m.UpperCaseName();
        }
    }
}

MyClass.cs

using System;

namespace ExtensionMethodTest.Domain
{
    public class MyClass
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }
}

MyClassExtensions.cs

using System;

namespace ExtensionMethodTest.Domain
{
    public static class MyClassExtensions
    {
        public static string UpperCaseName (this MyClass myClass)
        {
            return myClass.Name.ToUpper();
        }
    }
}

However, when I alias domain as follows in Program.cs:

using Domain = ExtensionMethodTest.Domain;

The extension method no longer works..

This can be rather frustrating when I'm dealing with converting various domain objects to contract objects (let's say I have 4 domain assemblies and 4 contract assemblies) for use in a web service. Using aliasing would be very handy as I could alias as follows and continue to use the various extension methods (such as ToContract, etc.):

using BillingContracts = Namespace.Billing.Contracts;
using IssuingContracts = Namespace.Issuing.Contracts;

etc...

I look forward to the answer.. I'm sure it's straight forward, but I, for the life of me, can't figure out why it doesn't work.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
It's a good question. I'm not sure of the exact answer, but it probably has to do with the fact that the extension method is tied to the extension method's type, not to its namespace. Hence, the type itself must be visible within your class, so you would still have to include a complete using statement. –  Robert Harvey Jul 26 '10 at 17:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Make sure to still add a non-aliased using statement:

Program.cs

using System;
using ExtensionMethodTest.Domain; //DON'T FORGET A NON-ALIASED USING
using MyDomain = ExtensionMethodTest.Domain;

namespace ExtensionMethodTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var m = new MyDomain.MyClass();
            var result = m.UpperCaseName();
        }
    }
}

MyClass.cs

using System;

namespace ExtensionMethodTest.Domain
{
    public class MyClass
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }
}

MyClassExtensions.cs

using System;

namespace ExtensionMethodTest.Domain
{
    public static class MyClassExtensions
    {
        public static string UpperCaseName (this MyClass myClass)
        {
            return myClass.Name.ToUpper();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was aware that a non aliased using statement would work, but I'm just curious as to why an aliased using statement doesn't work. :) –  Ian P Jul 26 '10 at 18:00
3  
An aliased using statement does not bring the aliased namespace into scope for name resolution. All it does is provide an alias to the specific namespace for convenience. Even though both of these statements are "using" statements, they act quite differently. It might help to think of "using X;" as a namespace #include, and "using Foo = X;" as a namespace #define. –  JaredReisinger Jul 26 '10 at 18:09
    
Ah, in that case I'd venture to guess that it's because defining an alias is not actually giving you access to that namespace, but providing a shortcut name to it... It's the same reason you would have to do BillingContracts.MyClass() instead of just MyClass() when you use an alias. –  m-y Jul 26 '10 at 18:09
1  
@JaredReisinger: Yep, you nailed it. –  Eric Lippert Jul 26 '10 at 20:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.