Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This isn't exactly a programming question but it is related.

I had read a fascinating article a while ago about a teacher who explained how he taught base 2 notation to first grade children, without even "teaching" them anything but making them discover both the problem and the solutions by asking relevant questions.

I can't find this article anymore, anywhere on the Web -- can anyone help?

Thanks.

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Will, Bill the Lizard Aug 23 '13 at 17:10

  • This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is not within the bounds of discussion as described in the help center. –  Will Aug 23 '13 at 15:21

2 Answers 2

He's using the Socratic method, so a search yields Teaching by Asking Instead of by Telling by Rick Garlikov.

From the text:

The experiment was to see whether I could teach these students binary arithmetic [...]

But only you know if this is the article you were looking for.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting article...good find :) –  Patrick Cuff Dec 2 '08 at 12:40
    
Impressive - it's the article I was looking for, and you're fast!!! –  Jon Galloway Dec 2 '08 at 12:56
    
that's a great article, actually had me smiling at the end! –  grapefrukt Dec 2 '08 at 13:07
    
Bambax, you can complete this question by clicking on the green V-symbol. :) –  csl Dec 2 '08 at 13:39

One method from my study class social competence: paradox intervention.

Claim you can count up to 1024 just with your ten fingers. They won't believe you, but you can. Each finger stands for one digit. If your finger is out, it stands for 1, otherwise for 0. All ten fingers out will represent 1023.

You can also try it with a method from "Die Sendung mit der Maus" (German teaching television). A marble run with buttons and a lamp on each twist: All lights off: 0 If you throw a marble, it hit's the first button and falls out of the run. If you throw the second, the button is switched again (lamp 1 off) and will let the marble roll further. The marble will hit the second switch (lamp 2 on) and falls out of the run.

So children can see, how to count with base 2. It may help you

share|improve this answer