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On git, how could I compare the same file between two different commits (not contiguous) on the same branch (master for example)?

I'm searching for a Compare feature like the one in VSS or TFS, is it possible in Git?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 368 down vote accepted
$ git diff $start_commit..$end_commit -- path/to/file

For instance, to see the difference for a file "main.c" between now and two commits back, here are two equivalent commands:

$ git diff HEAD^^ HEAD main.c
$ git diff HEAD^^..HEAD -- main.c
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21  
The .. isn't really necessary, though it'll work with it (except in fairly old versions, maybe). You can also use git log or gitk to find SHA1s to use, should the two commits be very far apart. gitk also has a "diff selected -> this" and "diff this -> selected" in its context menu. –  Jefromi Jul 26 '10 at 19:19
3  
Will this work even if the file name was modified between the 2 commits? –  reubenjohn Feb 14 at 16:14
4  
So what is the purpose of the "--" –  user64141 Aug 6 at 19:08

You can also compare two different files in two different revisions, like this:

git diff <revision_1>:<file_1> <revision_2>:<file_2>

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5  
note that it looks like if <file_1> and <file_2> are in the current directory, not on the top level git managed directory, one has to prepend ./ on Unix: <revision_1>:./filename_1 –  Andre Holzner Aug 12 '13 at 12:44

If you have configured the "difftool" you can use

git difftool revision_1:file_1 revision_2:file_2

Example: Comparing a file from its last commit to its previous commit on the same branch: Assuming that if you are in your project root folder

$git difftool HEAD:src/main/java/com.xyz.test/MyApp.java HEAD^:src/main/java/com.xyz.test/MyApp.java

You should have the following entries in your ~/.gitconfig or in project/.git/config file. Install the p4merge [This is my preferred diff and merge tool]

[merge]
    tool = p4merge
    keepBackup = false
[diff]
    tool = p4merge
    keepBackup = false
[difftool "p4merge"]
    path = C:/Program Files (x86)/Perforce/p4merge.exe
[mergetool "p4merge"]
    path = C:/Program Files (x86)/Perforce/p4merge.exe
    cmd = p4merge.exe \"$BASE\" \"$LOCAL\" \"$REMOTE\" \"$MERGED\"
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If you want to see all changes to the file between the two commits on a commit-by-commit basis, you can also do

git log -u $start_commit..$end_commit -- path/to/file

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Good one! Thanks –  armandino Nov 16 '12 at 20:46

If you want to make a diff with more than one file, with the method specified by @mipadi:

E.g. diff between HEAD and your master, to find all .coffee files:

git diff master..HEAD -- `find your_search_folder/ -name '*.coffee'`

This will recursively search your your_search_folder/ for all .coffee files and make a diff between them and their master versions.

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Here is a perl script that prints out git diff commands for a given file as found in a git log command.

e.g.

git log pom.xml | perl gldiff.pl 3 pom.xml

Yields:

git diff 5cc287:pom.xml e8e420:pom.xml
git diff 3aa914:pom.xml 7476e1:pom.xml
git diff 422bfd:pom.xml f92ad8:pom.xml

which could then be cut N pasted in a shell window session or piped to /bin/sh.

Notes:

  1. the number (3 in this case) specifies how many lines to print
  2. the file (pom.xml in this case) must agree in both places (you could wrap it in a shell function to provide the same file in both places) or put it in a bin dir as a shell script

Code:

# gldiff.pl
use strict;

my $max  = shift;
my $file = shift;

die "not a number" unless $max =~ m/\d+/;
die "not a file"   unless -f $file;

my $count;
my @lines;

while (<>) {
    chomp;
    next unless s/^commit\s+(.*)//;
    my $commit = $1;
    push @lines, sprintf "%s:%s", substr($commit,0,6),$file;
    if (@lines == 2) {
        printf "git diff %s %s\n", @lines;
        @lines = ();
    }
    last if ++$count >= $max *2;
}
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$git log Copy sha id of 2 different commits and then run git diff command with those sha-ids.

$git diff (sha-id one) (sha-id two)
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Just another way to use git's awesomeness ...

git difftool HEAD HEAD@{N} /PATH/FILE.ext
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If you have several files or directories and want to compare non continuous commits, you could do this:

Make a temporal branch

git checkout -b revision

Rewind to the first commit target

git reset --hard <commit_target>

Cherry picking on those commit interested

git cherry-pick <commit_interested> ...

Apply diff

git diff <commit-target>^

When you done

git branch -D revision
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Thanks for this solution. It worked well for my use case. The only thing i would update is that when your done you can't delete the branch until you switch off of it. –  Steven Dix Jul 9 '13 at 15:00

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