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I've written a special import function that will be used in a few places and I'd like to be able to just go "use ImportRenamer;" in those modules and have them use the import gained from ImportRenamer henceforth. How would i go about that?

Edit: In other words: How do i import 'import' without running it?

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The question title doesn't seem to match what you really want to do. Do you mean to export an 'import' sub, or do you just want 'import' to run automatically in some situations? DVK's answer answers the second case. –  Ether Jul 26 '10 at 19:26
    
It's the first case, which is the exact same thing i wrote up there, only with function instead of sub. I'm sorta confused as to how this is unclear. :D –  Mithaldu Jul 26 '10 at 19:30
    
@mithaldu - OK, just to confirm - do you want to have a sub called "import" in module "ImportRenamer", and (1) NOT run it when you do "use ImportRenamer" in a module called "MyModule1"; and (2) when you do use MyModule, it will run ImportRenamer::import() instead of MyModule::import()? –  DVK Jul 26 '10 at 19:35
    
@mithaldu: perhaps you can step back and explain what you are hoping to achieve, because you may be selecting the wrong implementation for this. –  Ether Jul 26 '10 at 19:59
    
@mithaldu - See my update in the answer. And I second Ether's suggestion from last comment –  DVK Jul 26 '10 at 20:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

UPDATE

Now that OP clarified his needs, this should indeed be done in a way similar to what Exported does, to be precise, by injecting the sub reference into a caller's namespace via a glob assignment. Example:

###############################################

package ImportRenamer; 
use strict;
sub import_me {
   print "I am a cool importer\n";
}

sub import { 
  my ($callpkg)=caller(0);
  print "Setting ${callpkg}::import to ImportRenamer::import_me\n"; 
  no strict "refs";
  *{$callpkg."::import"} = \&ImportRenamer::import_me; # Work happens here!!!
  use strict "refs";
}
1;

###############################################

package My; 
use strict;
use ImportRenamer; 
1;

###############################################

package My2; 
use strict;
use ImportRenamer; 
1;

###############################################

And the test:

> perl -e '{  package main; use My; use My2; 1;}'
Setting My::import to ImportRenamer::import_me
I am a cool importer
Setting My2::import to ImportRenamer::import_me
I am a cool importer

ORIGINAL ANSWER

You don't need to do anything special beyond calling the import method "import". use already calls import(), see perldoc use:

use Module LIST 

Imports some semantics into the current package from the named module, generally by aliasing certain subroutine or variable names into your package.

It is exactly equivalent to:

 BEGIN { require Module; Module->import( LIST ); }
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I don't think this answers the OP's question. It seems to me that his problem is more, "How do I hide the build-in import with my module?" –  JSBձոգչ Jul 26 '10 at 19:27
    
As JSBangs says. Your answer tells me how to run import from outside. I want to import 'import'. –  Mithaldu Jul 26 '10 at 19:31
    
@mithaldu - OK, just to confirm - do you want to have a sub called "import" in module "ImportRenamer", and (1) NOT run it when you do "use ImportRenamer" in a module called "MyModule1"; and (2) when you do use MyModule, it will run ImportRenamer::import() instead of MyModule::import()? –  DVK Jul 26 '10 at 19:35
    
Correct. I'm not particularly picky what "import" is called in ImportRenamer, but i want to be able to go "use ImportRenamer;" in MyModule, so MyModule::import becomes the function that ImportRenamer exports. Maybe i should look at how Exporter does it. –  Mithaldu Jul 26 '10 at 19:40
    
@JSBangs - OK, now I git it. Updated –  DVK Jul 26 '10 at 20:13

How about something like this:

package Your::Module;

use strict;
use warnings;

sub import { 
    # gets called by use Your::Module
    my ( $pkg ) = caller;

    no strict 'refs';
    *{ $pkg . '::import' } = \&_real_import;
}

sub _real_import { 
    # import function to be exported to caller
    print "blah blah";
}

This manually assigns the _real_import sub to the import slot of the calling package's namespace. If you do this in a BEGIN block, then the import sub should be ready and waiting when that package gets used.

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You need to write a custom import method in your module that will export your function you want to be called import in the calling namespace.

Here's some untested code:

package ImportMe;

sub import { 

    # Get package name
    my $caller = caller;

    # Install my_import into the calling package as import
    {    no strict 'refs';
         *{"${caller}::import"} = \&my_import;
    }

    return 1;
}

# renamed as import when installing
sub my_import {

   # do stuff

}

Now you can put use ImportMe; in all your modules and an import method will be installed.

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As an alternative, you can avoid mucking around in the symbol table by using Sub::Exporter

package Your::Module;

use Sub::Exporter (
    -setup => {
        exports => {
            import => sub { return \&_real_import }
        },
        # the "default" group auto-exports "import" without the caller 
        # specifically asking for it
        groups => { default => [qw(import)] },
    }
);

sub _real_import { ... }

EDIT: added the "default" group for auto-exporting

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