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I've simple class method like

Task TaskSample::Create(void)
{
    Task task;
    return task;
}

and got warning taking address of temporary. Is something wrong with this code ? I prefer to not use pointer here

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When working with class, it is not really efficient to return a class object (especially if the Task class/structure is big). –  Phong Jul 27 '10 at 0:23
4  
@Phong: I recently discovered that NRVO (named return value optimisation) will kick in. The standard permits an optimisation that bypasses the copy constructor of a class when returning a class instance from a method. –  dreamlax Jul 27 '10 at 0:37
3  
@Phong: Depending on the context, not returning can be less efficient, because you force clients to default-construct your object before the function can be called. –  Billy ONeal Jul 27 '10 at 0:44
1  
@zigi, The answer of @Billy ONeil is correct, there is nothing wrong with the code you submitted. You will need to give us more details. What exactly is the error message you are getting? And exactly what line of code is giving the warning? Do you call this method in your code, like "Task &t = TaskSample::Create()" ? –  Aaron McDaid Jul 27 '10 at 1:39
1  
No, you haven't gotten a warning like that from that code. Either your code is fake, of your description of the warning is fake. Post either the real code or the real warning you are getting. –  AnT Jul 27 '10 at 2:05

4 Answers 4

If that is actually what your code is, then the compiler is probably in error.

More likely, however, you actually wrote this:

Task& TaskSample::Create(void)
{
    Task task;
    return task;
}

Remove the & to return by value, instead of by reference. Returning by reference there makes no sense because task will be destroyed when the function returns.

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Both of the following code snippets produce this error in MS C++:

warning C4172: returning address of local variable or temporary

Task* Create(void)
{
    Task task;
    return &task;
}
Task& Create2(void)
{
    Task task;
    return task;
}

MSDN documentation describes the warning quite succintly:

Local variables and temporary objects are destroyed when a function returns, so the address returned is not valid.

In order to return a pointer to an object you need to call operator new as an object allocated on the heap will not go out of scope:

Task* Create(void)
{
    Task* task = new Task();
    return task;
}

Don't forget to delete that task once you are done with it:

Task* task = Create();
delete task;

Alternatively you can use a smart pointer:

void Test () {
  boost::scoped_ptr<Task> spTask = Create();
  spTask->Schedule(); 
} //<--- spTask is deleted here

I would instead rely on RVO and actually use the code that you posted and which is most likely not the code giving you a warning.

void Test() {
   Task task = Create();
}

Task Create(void)
{
    Task task;
    task.start = 10;
    return task;
}

This may generate something equivalent to this, so really, there is no copy constructor overhead.

void Test() {
   Task task;
   Create(&task);
}

Task* Create(Task* __compilerGeneratedParam)
{
    __compilerGeneratedParam->start = 10;
    return __compilerGeneratedParam;
}   
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Modern compilers can optimize return value to avoid copying overhead. Often returning by value doesn't hurt performance at all.

But if you need to return by reference, use shared_ptr instead.

shared_ptr<Task> TaskSample::Create(void)
{
    shared_ptr<Task> ptr(new Task(...));
    return ptr;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
If you chose to return dynamically allocated memory, auto_ptr [or possibly unique_ptr if you have access to C++0x] is probably more appropriate here. –  Dennis Zickefoose Jul 27 '10 at 2:15
    
auto_ptr has move semantics and easy to misuse. The default general purpose smart pointer should be shared_ptr, because it behaves like a plain pointer plus it does memory delocation for you. The other smart pointers are useful only in special cases and should not be considered as replacements for plain pointers. –  user401947 Jul 27 '10 at 2:32
    
@m141: Actually, unique_ptr is the better choice if it is available. However, it's available on C++0x only. You get most of the benefits of shared_ptr, but you can define ownership of the object much more simply. –  Billy ONeal Jul 27 '10 at 2:37
    
@rn141: move semantics are what are required here. All smart pointers behave like a pointer. All smart pointers do memory deallocation. Plain pointers should be the absolute last choice as they are not exception safe (and most likely to be used incorrectly), and only when ownership is clearly defined to belong somewhere else. This is the perfect case for auto_ptr (or in the newer version of c++ unique_ptr –  Loki Astari Jul 27 '10 at 3:12
    
We use pointers in order to avoid copying heavy objects or for shared ownership. If ownership is limited to a particular scope, then scoped_ptr could be more appropriate (please leave unique_ptr alone until it becomes a standard) When it works, elide optimization is much better than any smart pointer. shared_ptr can work where auto_ptr can't. There are plenty of online blogs and articles about auto_ptr screw ups. Herb Sutter published several GotWs about auto_ptr troubles. These days I don't any auto_ptr in industrial C++ code. 99% of smart pointers are shared_ptr and the rest is scoped_ptr. –  user401947 Jul 27 '10 at 3:56

The best would be, to pass the object by reference as follows

void TaskSample::Create(Task& data)
{

....

}
share|improve this answer
3  
-1: This may have been true at one time, but now you're better off doing the ideomatic thing and just returning the object. The compiler's going to optimize the copy if necessary, and the result is better code. –  Billy ONeal Jul 27 '10 at 2:08

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