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I saw this thread

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3339929/if-a-utilities-class-is-evil-where-do-i-put-my-generic-code

and thought why are utility classes evil?

edit -- here is a specific example that might be instructive. Lets say I have a domain model that is dozens of classes deep. I need to be able to xml-ify instances. Do I make a toXml method on the parent? Do I make a MyDomainXmlUtility.toXml helper class? This is a case where the business need spans the entire domain model -- does it really belong as an instance method? What about if there are a bunch of auxiliary methods on the xml functionality of the application?

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4  
The devaluation of the term "evil" is evil! –  Matthew Lock Jul 27 '10 at 1:35
    
@matthew i preserved the terms of the post on which my question is based...;) –  hvgotcodes Jul 27 '10 at 1:43
    
Utility classes are a bad idea for the same reasons singletons are. –  CurtainDog Jul 27 '10 at 4:08
    
The debate on whether to have a toXML method is one that is centered on rich versus anemic domain models. codeflow.blogspot.com/2007/05/anemic-vs-rich-domain-models.html –  James Poulson Feb 6 '11 at 3:35
    
@james, the toXML is just an example...what about some regex functionality that is used all over the place? Like, you need to do some stuff with the strings across your domain model, but you couldnt use subclassing due to another overriding concern that used your one superclass (in java) –  hvgotcodes Feb 6 '11 at 3:40
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8 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Utility classes aren't exactly evil, but they can violate the principles that compose a good object-oriented design. In a good object-oriented design, most classes should represent a single thing and all of it's attributes and operations. If you are operating on a thing, that method should probably be a member of that thing.

However, there are times when you can use utility classes to group a number of methods together - an example being the java.util.Collections class which provides a number of utilities that can be used on any Java Collection. These aren't specific to one particular type of Collection, but instead implement algorithms that can be used on any Collection.

Really, what you need to do is think about your design and determine where it makes the most sense to put the methods. Usually, it's as operations inside of a class. However, sometimes, it is indeed as a utility class. When you do use a utility class, however, don't just throw random methods into it - organize the methods by purpose and functionality.

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ties in well with this article about checking utility / helper class against SOLID oo principle as well readability.com/articles/rk1vvcqy –  melaos Sep 18 '12 at 15:18
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I think that the general consensus is that utility classes are not evil per se. You just need to use them judiciously:

  • Design the static utility methods to be general and reusable. Make sure that they are stateless; i.e. no static variables.

  • If you have lots of utility methods, partition them into classes in a way that will make it easy for developers to find them.

  • Don't use utility classes where static or instance methods in a domain class would be a better solution. For example, consider if methods in an abstract base class or an instantiable helper class would be a better solution.


The other way to look at this Question is to observe that in the quoted Question, "If utility classes are "evil"" is a strawman argument. Its like me asking "If pigs can fly, should I carry an umbrella?". My question is not actually saying that pigs can fly ... or that I agree with the proposition that they could fly. And besides all "xyz is evil" arguments all start out rhetorical devices that are intended to make you think twice ... not as statements of literal fact.

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OK - why the random down-vote? –  Stephen C Jul 27 '10 at 1:23
3  
someone's mouse slipped? –  Nadjib Oct 30 '12 at 11:48
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Utility classes are problematic because they fail to group responsibilities with the data that supports them.

They are however extremely useful and I build them all the time as either permanent structures or as stepping stones during a more thorough refactor.

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i thought utility classes were built to support data, not the other way around, like you intoned...? –  hvgotcodes Jul 27 '10 at 1:01
    
To clarify my answer, the role of a class is to provide instance objects that combine state with a series of methods that act on that state. My definition of a Utility Class for which no instances can be created, has no state of its own and only stateless static methods that act purely on their input. This makes them oddballs in an object oriented system since they are not really classes at all. However, that is largely a philosophical problem rather than a practical problem. –  Alain O'Dea Jul 27 '10 at 1:20
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I suppose it starts to become evil when

1) It gets too big (just group them into meaningful categories in this case).
2) Methods that should not be static methods are present (methods that read/write on external state (other than local variables)).

But as long as these conditions are not met, I think they are very useful.

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It's very easy to brand something a utility simply because the designer couldn't think of an appropriate place to put the code. There are often few true "utilities".

As a rule of thumb, I usually keep code in the package where it is first used, and then only refactor to a more generic place if I find that later it really is needed elsewhere. The only exception is if I already have a package that performs similar/related functionality, and the code best fits there.

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Utility classes are bad because they mean you were too lazy to think up a better name for the class :)

That being said, I am lazy. Sometimes you just need to get the job done and your mind's a blank .. that's when "Utility" classes start creeping in.

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Utility classes containing stateless static methods can be useful. These are often very easy to unit test.

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When I can't add a method to a class (say, Account is locked against changes by Jr. Developers), I just add a few static methods to my Utilities class like so:

public static int method01_Account(Object o, String... args) {
    Account acc = (Account)o;
    ...
    return acc.getInt();
}  
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Looks like you are the Jr one to me.. :P The non-evil way to do this is to politely ask your "Jr Developer" to unlock the Account file. Or better, go with non-locking source control systems. –  Sudeep Oct 2 '13 at 1:23
    
I assume he meant that the Account file was locked such that Jr. Developers can't make changes to it. As a Jr. Developer, to get around it, he did as above. That said, still better to just get write access to the file and do it properly. –  Doc Oct 31 '13 at 17:54
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