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I am trying to optimize a piece of code which compares elements of list.

Eg.

public void compare(Set<Record> firstSet, Set<Record> secondSet){
    for(Record firstRecord : firstSet){
        for(Record secondRecord : secondSet){
            // comparing logic
        }
    }
}

Please take into account that the number of records in sets will be high.

Thanks

Shekhar

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5  
It is not possible to optimize the loops without knowing (and modifying) the comparing logic. Could you show more of your code? –  josefx Jul 27 '10 at 6:46

5 Answers 5

firstSet.equals(secondSet)

It really depends on what you want to do in the comparison logic... ie what happens if you find an element in one set not in the other? Your method has a void return type so I assume you'll do the necessary work in this method.

More fine-grained control if you need it:

if (!firstSet.containsAll(secondSet)) {
  // do something if needs be
}
if (!secondSet.containsAll(firstSet)) {
  // do something if needs be
}

If you need to get the elements that are in one set and not the other.
EDIT: set.removeAll(otherSet) returns a boolean, not a set. To use removeAll(), you'll have to copy the set then use it.

Set one = firstSet;
Set two = secondSet
one.removeAll(secondSet);
two.removeAll(firstSet);

If the contents of one and two are both empty, then you know that the two sets were equal. If not, then you've got the elements that made the sets unequal.

You mentioned that the number of records might be high. If the underlying implementation is a HashSet then the fetching of each record is done in O(1) time, so you can't really get much better than that. TreeSet is O(log n).

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+1 for adding containsAll –  stacker Jul 27 '10 at 6:44
2  
The implementation of equals() and hashcode() for the Record class is equally important, when invoking equals() on the Set. –  Vineet Reynolds Jul 27 '10 at 6:44
1  
I'm not sure that the the removeAll() examples are correct. removeAll() returns a boolean, not another Set. The elements in secondSet are actually removed from firstSet and true is returned if a change has been made. –  rdc Oct 21 '12 at 20:30
    
The removeAll example still isn't right because you haven't made copies (Set one = firstSet; Set two = secondSet). I'd use the copy constructor. –  Michael Rusch Jun 7 '13 at 14:58
    
Actually, the default implementation of equals is faster than two calls to containsAll in the worst case; see my answer. –  Stephen C Sep 13 '13 at 9:55

If you simply want to know if the sets are equal, the equals method on AbstractSet is implemented roughly as below:

    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        if (o == this)
            return true;
        if (!(o instanceof Set))
            return false;
        Collection c = (Collection) o;
        if (c.size() != size())
            return false;
        return containsAll(c);
    }

Note how it optimizes the common cases where:

  • the two objects are the same
  • the other object is not a set at all, and
  • the two sets' sizes are different.

After that, containsAll(...) will return false as soon as it finds an element in the other set that is not also in this set. But if all elements are present in both sets, it will need to test all of them.

The worst case performance therefore occurs when the two sets are equal but not the same objects. That cost is typically O(N) or O(NlogN) depending on the implementation of this.containsAll(c).

And you get close-to-worst case performance if the sets are large and only differ in a tiny percentage of the elements.


UPDATE

If you are willing to invest time in a custom set implementation, there is an approach that can improve the "almost the same" case.

The idea is that you need to pre-calculate and cache a hash for the entire set so that you could get the set's current hashcode value in O(1). Then you can compare the hashcode for the two sets as an acceleration.

How could you implement a hashcode like that? Well if the set hashcode was:

  • zero for an empty set, and
  • the XOR of all of the element hashcodes for a non-empty set,

then you could cheaply update the set's cached hashcode each time you added or removed an element. In both cases, you simply XOR the element's hashcode with the current set hashcode.

Of course, this assumes that element hashcodes are stable while the elements are members of sets. It also assumes that the element classes hashcode function gives a good spread. That is because when the two set hashcodes are the same you still have to fall back to the O(N) comparison of all elements.


You could take this idea a bit further ... at least in theory.

Suppose that your set element class has a method to return a crypto checksums for the element. Now implement the set's checksums by XORing the checksums returned for the elements.

What does this buy us?

Well, if we assume that nothing underhand is going on, the probability that any two unequal set elements have the same N-bit checksums is 2-N. And the probability 2 unequal sets have the same N-bit checksums is also 2-N. So my idea is that you can implement equals as:

    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        if (o == this)
            return true;
        if (!(o instanceof Set))
            return false;
        Collection c = (Collection) o;
        if (c.size() != size())
            return false;
        return checksums.equals(c.checksums);
    }

Under the assumptions above, this will only give you the wrong answer once in 2-N time. If you make N large enough (e.g. 512 bits) the probability of a wrong answer becomes negligible (e.g. roughly 10-150).

The down side is that computing the crypto checksums for elements is very expensive, especially as the number of bits increases. So you really need an effective mechanism for memoizing the checksums. And that could be problematic.

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Converting a very large set is massively dangerous because you're crunching so much information down into one little hash. It's quick, but I wouldn't fly in a plane who's auto pilot used this. Its the kind of but that would get through testing and then fail catastrophically 5 years later. –  couling 2 days ago
    
@couling - I think you are missing the point. Comparing normal hashes is never (repeat NEVER) a substitute for testing for equality. And that is NOT what I am suggesting here. Rather, a hash provides a way to avoid doing an expensive equality test in most cases. –  Stephen C 2 days ago
    
@couling - Your autopilot comparison is not apropos. Autopilot software doesn't need to compare large sets ... and it wouldn't be written in Java (or similar languages) in the first place. And it should also be obvious that I am recommending that you chose your algorithms to fit the situation. So for example, no sensible person would use a "probabilistically correct" approach in a situation where getting it wrong could have catastrophic consequences. –  Stephen C 2 days ago
    
I can't see any reference in your answer to hashes being used that way (combining the two solutions), and that's definitely not what your example code does. I can only comment on your answer as written. The point I make re autopilot is that it's very rarely appropriate to knowingly write software which randomly fails even if exceedingly rarely. I say this from bitter experience of having spent weeks debugging code due to developers who miscalculated the odds or just didn't care. –  couling yesterday
public boolean equals(Object o) {
        if (o == this)
            return true;
        if (!(o instanceof Set))
            return false;

        Set<String> a = this;
        Set<String> b = o;
        Set<String> thedifference_a_b = new HashSet<String>(a);


        thedifference_a_b.removeAll(b);
        if(thedifference_a_b.isEmpty() == false) return false;

        Set<String> thedifference_b_a = new HashSet<String>(b);
        thedifference_b_a.removeAll(a);

        if(thedifference_b_a.isEmpty() == false) return false;

        return true;
    }
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There is a method in Guava Sets which can help here:

public static <E>  boolean equals(Set<? extends E> set1, Set<? extends E> set2){
return Sets.symmetricDifference(set1,set2).isEmpty();
}
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There's an O(N) solution for very specific cases where:

  • the sets are both sorted
  • both sorted in the same order

The following code assumes that both sets are based on the records comparable. A similar method could be based on on a Comparator.

    public class SortedSetComparitor <Foo extends Comparable<Foo>> 
            implements Comparator<SortedSet<Foo>> {

        @Override
        public int compare( SortedSet<Foo> arg0, SortedSet<Foo> arg1 ) {
            Iterator<Foo> otherRecords = arg1.iterator();
            for (Foo thisRecord : arg0) {
                // Shorter sets sort first.
                if (!otherRecords.hasNext()) return 1;
                int comparison = thisRecord.compareTo(otherRecords.next());
                if (comparison != 0) return comparison;
            }
            // Shorter sets sort first
            if (otherRecords.hasNext()) return -1;
            else return 0;
        }
    }
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