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public updateList(lst) {
  lst += "a"
}

List lst = []
updateList(lst)
println(lst)

This prints an empty list. However;

public updateList(lst) {
  lst.add("a")
}

List lst = []
updateList(lst)
println(lst)

, will print "a" as desired.

I always assumed += was the same as .add(), but obviously not. I assume += is creating a new List, whereas .add() only updated the existing List?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The first method calls plus on the lst variable

As we can see from the documentation this will:

Create a collection as a union of a Collection and an Object.

So a new collection will be returned, and the original lst (outside the scope of this method) will be unchanged. (Obviously, inside this method's scope, lst will be a new list with one element)

This can be seen by printing out the result of the updateList method:

public updateList(lst) {
  lst += "a"  // calls plus, creates a new list, and returns this new list.
              // lst (outside the context of this method) is unmodified
}

List lst = []
println( updateList(lst) )

If you call add, then you call the standard java add method.

public updateList(lst) {
  lst.add "a"
}

So the original lst is modified

An alternative to add would be to use the leftShift operator:

public updateList(lst) {
  lst << "a"
}

Which calls add behind the scenes: (code from Groovy trunk source)

public static <T> Collection<T> leftShift(Collection<T> self, T value) {
    self.add(value);
    return self;
}
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1  
That's why many languages do not allow operator overloading. Sure lst + elt and lst << elt looks kinda cool, but it's not particularly clear. –  back2dos Jul 27 '10 at 11:09
    
Thankyou - an excellent explanation. –  Amoeba Jul 27 '10 at 12:08
    
I would expect the syntax lst += "a" to mean that the element "a" is being added in-place to the list lst, i.e. lst = lst + "a", but the semantics for this (Codehaus)Groovy syntax is indeed confusing. Taking seriously the JSR (241) to standardize Groovy semantics after open public discussions would've prevented these highly unintuitive corner cases. –  Gavin Grover Oct 19 at 12:52

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