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I have tried to delay - or put to sleep - my Java program, but an error occurs.

I'm unable to use Thread.sleep(x) or wait(). The same error message appears:

unreported exception java.lang.InterruptedException; must be caught or declared to be thrown.

Is there any step required before using the Thread.sleep() or wait() methods?

share|improve this question
    
Well, this is popular. There must be an enormous number of people who need to delay their Java program for a few seconds. Hard to imagine. Of course, putting the correct title on the post would help immensely. – Robert Harvey Jun 29 at 22:15

10 Answers 10

up vote 499 down vote accepted

You have a lot of reading ahead of you. From compiler errors through exception handling, threading and thread interruptions. But this will do what you want:

try {
    Thread.sleep(1000);                 //1000 milliseconds is one second.
} catch(InterruptedException ex) {
    Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your help, i able to run it.. beside, what is the use for catch(interruptedException ex) – vincent low Jul 27 '10 at 10:35
3  
See reply from Abel. Google for InterruptedException. Making a long story short: The thread can be interrupted while sleeping, and this is a kind of exception which needs to be explicitly handled. – Konrad Garus Jul 27 '10 at 10:46
6  
Some answers tell to do nothing on the exception, some say to throw, this tells to interrupt(). Would someone care to discuss which is appropriate and why? – Suma May 21 '13 at 9:53
6  
@Suma There plenty discussion on it, including Stack Overflow itself. Just search for it. Too long for a comment. After a few years, the only answer I have is: it depends. Usually the ideal solution is to terminate whatever the thread is doing gracefully (e.g. roll back this transaction, break a loop etc.), but that's very context dependent. – Konrad Garus May 21 '13 at 11:40
1  

As other users have said you should surround your call with a try{...} catch{...} block. But since Java 1.5 was released, there is TimeUnit class which do the same as Thread.sleep(millis) but is more convenient. You can pick time unit for sleep operation.

try {
    TimeUnit.NANOSECONDS.sleep(100);
    TimeUnit.MICROSECONDS.sleep(100);
    TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.sleep(100);
    TimeUnit.SECONDS.sleep(100);
    TimeUnit.MINUTES.sleep(100);
    TimeUnit.HOURS.sleep(100);
    TimeUnit.DAYS.sleep(100);
} catch (InterruptedException e) {
    //Handle exception
}

Also it has additional methods: TimeUnit Oracle Documentation

share|improve this answer
110  
sleeping for 100 Days ;-) – user1448729 Aug 29 '13 at 7:15
6  
See other answers for example of how to surround these calls with the required try-catch exception handling. – Basil Bourque Oct 28 '13 at 3:33
11  
This thread would sleep for 105 days approximately ;) – puneet Apr 27 '14 at 10:10
3  
it's InterruptedException not InteruptedException ! – Hunsu Aug 1 '14 at 15:48
1  
Dont forget " import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;" – coder Nov 21 '15 at 21:12

Have a look at this excellent brief post on how to do this properly.

Essentially: catch the InterruptedException. Remember that you must add this catch-block. The post explains this a bit further.

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Use the following coding construct to handle exceptions

try {
  Thread.sleep(1000);
} catch (InterruptedException ie) {
    //Handle exception
}
share|improve this answer

Put your Thread.sleep in a try catch block

try {
    //thread to sleep for the specified number of milliseconds
    Thread.sleep(100);
} catch ( java.lang.InterruptedException ie) {
    System.out.println(ie);
}
share|improve this answer

Try this:

try{

    Thread.sleep(100);
}catch(Exception e)
{
   System.out.println("Exception caught");
}
share|improve this answer
7  
Isn't it bad practice to catch Exception in Java? – anthropomorphic Aug 23 '14 at 5:31
    
Better catch InterruptedException like the other answers here – devsaw Oct 15 '15 at 19:16
    
This is called a 'Pokemon Exception Handler' - gotta catch em all. – James Scott Tayler Apr 1 at 20:25

When using Android (the only time when I use Java) I would recommend using a handler instead putting the thread to sleep.

final Handler handler = new Handler();
    handler.postDelayed(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            Log.i(TAG, "I've waited for two hole seconds to show this!");

        }
    }, 2000);

Reference: http://developer.android.com/reference/android/os/Handler.html

share|improve this answer
2  
This is for Android not for Core Java – Ganesh Krishnan Mar 18 at 0:24
public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
  //type code


  short z=1000;
  Thread.sleep(z);/*will provide 2 second delay alter data type of z or value of z for longer                              delays required*/

  //type code
}

eg:-

class TypeCasting {

  public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
    short f = 1;
    int a = 123687889;
    short b = 2;
    long c = 4567;
    long d=45;
    short z=1000;
    System.out.println("Value of a,b and c are\n" + a + "\n" + b + "\n" + c + "respectively");
    c = a;
    b = (short) c;
    System.out.println("Typecasting...........");
    Thread.sleep(z);
    System.out.println("Value of B after Typecasting" + b);
    System.out.println("Value of A is" + a);


  }
}
share|improve this answer

My ways to add delay to a Java program.

public void pause1(long sleeptime) {
    try {
        Thread.sleep(sleeptime);
    } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
        //ToCatchOrNot
    }
}

public void pause2(long sleeptime) {
    Object obj = new Object();
    if (sleeptime > 0) {
        synchronized (obj) {
            try {
                obj.wait(sleeptime);
            } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
                //ToCatchOrNot
            }
        }
    }
}
public void pause3(long sleeptime) {
    expectedtime = System.currentTimeMillis() + sleeptime;
    while (System.currentTimeMillis() < expectedtime) {
        //Empty Loop   
    }
}

This is for sequential delay but for Loop delays refer to Java Delay/Wait.

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While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. – André Schild Nov 5 '15 at 7:36
    
Please note that blatant self-promotion is not allowed here. See the last point here in the Help Center. You can, however, put the link in your profile - that is allowed. – S.L. Barth Nov 5 '15 at 7:37
    
Sorry guys. won't do it again... – D.R.Bendanillo Nov 6 '15 at 5:18

Alternatively, if you don't want to deal with threads, try this method:

public static void pause(int seconds){
    Date start = new Date();
    Date end = new Date();
    while(end.getTime() - start.getTime() < seconds * 1000){
        end = new Date();
    }
}

It starts when you call it, and ends when the number of seconds have passed.

share|improve this answer
6  
This would consume CPU during the sleep time. On Thread.sleep() the thread can be descheduled. – Vivek Pandey Jun 28 '13 at 9:28
    
guess how many iteration it will do on an average pc – user1448729 Aug 29 '13 at 7:16
4  
How can you NOT deal with threads in Java? – impeto Jun 4 '14 at 2:26
    
you are ridi and there is no water :D – M410 Jul 6 '14 at 23:08
14  
user2276378 had misunderstood the question's English. OP said he was "unable to used sleep or wait" which user2276378 thought to mean that he could not use them (or wasn't allowed to use them) and so he provided a valid solution that did not use sleep or wait. Try not to be too harsh English isn't everyone's first language. – David Newcomb Oct 9 '14 at 9:35

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