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I want to replace leading space with   same number of occurrences i.e.

Bit explanatory :

If one leading space exist in input then it should replace with one  

If two leading spaces exist in input then it should replace with two  

If n leading spaces are exist in input then it should replace with exact n number of times with  

Ex.1:
 My name is XYZ
output:
 My name is XYZ

Ex.2 :
  My name is XYZ
output:
  My name is XYZ

I want to replace only leading spaces, using PHP regex.

Your suggestion are welcome.

Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
$len_before = strlen($str);
$str = ltrim($str, ' ');
$len_after = strlen($str);
$str = str_repeat(' ', $len_before - $len_after) . $str;

Using preg_replace there is also

$str = preg_replace('/^( +)/e', 'str_repeat(" ", strlen("$1"))', $str);

but note that it uses the /e flag.

See http://www.ideone.com/VWNKZ for the result.

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thats not regex. –  Talvi Watia Jul 27 '10 at 11:00
    
that is not Regexp, but it is the best way and less heavy! +1 –  CuSS Jul 27 '10 at 11:01
    
Don’t forget the m flag to have ^ match the begin of a line. –  Gumbo Jul 27 '10 at 11:08
preg_replace('/\G /', ' ', $str);

\G matches the position where the last match ended, or the beginning of the string if there's no previous match.

edit: Actually, in PHP it matches where the next match is supposed to begin. That isn't necessarily the same as where the previous match ended.

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+1 simple and objective answer –  CuSS Jul 27 '10 at 11:12
    
@All : Thanks folks for your response. @Alan : I followed your approach. I just wanted to know for better approach to follow which one is optimum, efficient among flag 'G', 'm' and 'e', so that i'll hv actual reason to use mentioned flags –  pravin Jul 27 '10 at 11:18
    
Well, m allows the ^ to match at the beginning of a line as well as at the beginning of the string, so it's not relevant in this case. e causes the replacement to be treated as code instead of as a static string. That could get very expensive indeed, but in practice the code is usually short and quick. Even so, \G will usually be the most efficient option. –  Alan Moore Jul 27 '10 at 11:43

Use:

preg_replace('/^ +/m',' ',$str);

You can test it here

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+1 simple and objective answer –  CuSS Jul 27 '10 at 11:12
3  
The objective is to replace each of the leading spaces with  . You're replacing all of them with one  . –  Alan Moore Jul 27 '10 at 11:20
    
@alan you are right. my bad... I hate slashes for delimiters, btw, why I use #.. –  Talvi Watia Jul 27 '10 at 11:29

Use preg_match with PREG_OFFSET_CAPTURE flag set, the offset is the length of the "spaces". Then use str_repeat with the offset.

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