Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know how to use LOCK to thread-safely increment a value:

  lock inc     [J];

But how do I read [J] (or any value) in a thread-safe manner? The LOCK prefix can't be used with mov. And if I do the following:

  xor eax, eax;
  lock add eax, [J];
  mov [JC], eax;

It raises an error on line 2.

share|improve this question
    
What is it that you're trying to achieve here? –  Iridium Jul 27 '10 at 17:35
    
All I want to do is read [J] in a thread-safe way. –  IanC Jul 27 '10 at 19:20
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use XADD or MOV instruction instead ADD instruction! See also MFENCE, LFENCE and SFENCE instructions!

EDIT: You can't use LOCK instruction with ADD instruction if source operand is a memory operand!

From: "Intel® 64 and IA-32 ArchitecturesSoftware Developer’s Manual"

The LOCK prefix can be prepended only to the following instructions and only to those forms of the instructions where the destination operand is a memory operand: ADD, ADC, AND, BTC, BTR, BTS, CMPXCHG, CMPXCH8B, DEC, INC, NEG, NOT, OR, SBB, SUB, XOR, XADD, and XCHG. If the LOCK prefix is used with one of these instructions and the source operand is a memory operand, an undefined opcode exception (#UD) may be generated. An undefined opcode exception will also be generated if the LOCK prefix is used with any instruction not in the above list. The XCHG instruction always asserts the LOCK# signal regardless of the presence or absence of the LOCK prefix

EDIT2: Form: "Intel® 64 and IA-32 ArchitecturesSoftware Developer’s Manual, Volume3A"

8.1.1 Guaranteed Atomic Operations. The Intel486 processor (and newer processors since) guarantees that the following basic memory operations will always be carried out atomically:

  • Reading or writing a byte
  • Reading or writing a word aligned on a 16-bit boundary
  • Reading or writing a doubleword aligned on a 32-bit boundary

The Pentium processor (and newer processors since) guarantees that the following additional memory operations will always be carried out atomically:

  • Reading or writing a quadword aligned on a 64-bit boundary
  • 6-bit accesses to uncached memory locations that fit within a 32-bit
    data bus The P6 family processors
    (and newer processors since)
    guarantee that the following
    additional memory operation will
    always be carried out atomically:
  • Unaligned 16-, 32-, and 64-bit accesses to cached memory that fit
    within a cache line

Accesses to cacheable memory that are split across bus widths, cache lines, and page boundaries are not guaranteed to be atomic by the Intel Core 2 Duo, Intel Core Duo, Pentium M, Pentium 4, Intel Xeon, P6 family, Pentium, and Intel486 processors. The Intel Core 2 Duo, Intel Core Duo, Pentium M, Pentium 4, Intel Xeon, and P6 family processors provide bus control signals that permit external memory subsystems to make split accesses atomic; however, nonaligned data accesses will seriously impact the performance of the processor and should be avoided.

So, for reading I prefare to use CMPXCHG instruction with LOCK prefix, like:

LOCK        CMPXCHG   EAX, [J]

For writting:

MOV   [J], EAX
SFENSE

.

share|improve this answer
    
The complier refuses to compile line 2. Even changing it to: xadd eax, dword ptr J; doesn't work. –  IanC Jul 27 '10 at 19:20
    
Yes the reason is that source operand is a memory operand! –  GJ. Jul 27 '10 at 20:32
    
Thanks for the clarification on why it wouldn't compile. So it seems I would either have to use the fencing instructions, or just make a snapshot of the value which, since it's being processed read only, shouldn't be a problem thread-safety-wise: mov eax, [J]; mov [JSnapshot], eax; –  IanC Jul 27 '10 at 21:46
    
Check my second EDIT :) –  GJ. Jul 28 '10 at 3:56
    
Like it says, an aligned 32 bit value is automatically atomic. Nice! Thanks. –  IanC Jul 28 '10 at 15:51
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.