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Playing with log4net, I have seen the possibility to use a per-thread stack of context labels called the NDC.

The labels pushed on this stack are displayed in a PatternLayout by specifying the %x or the %ndc format parameter.

The usage is something like:

ILog log = log4net.LogManager.GetLogger(...) ;

//pattern layout format: "[%ndc] - %message%newline"

log.Info("message 1"); 
using(log4net.NDC.Push("context")
{
    using(log4net.NDC.Push("inner_context")
    {
      log.Info("message 2"); 
    }
    log.Info("message 3"); 
}
log.Info("message 4");

The output is something like:

null - message 1
context inner_context - message 2
context - message 3
null - message 4

In your programming experience with log4net, when did you find this feature to be useful?

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2  
It looks like log4net has deprecated NDC in favor of general purpose context stacks. The advice in the answers is still true, but logging.apache.org/log4net/release/manual/contexts.html says "The NDC (Nested Diagnostic Context) exists for compatibility with older versions of log4net. This helper class implements a stack which is stored in the thread context property named NDC." –  Michael Levy May 7 '14 at 17:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

In a server application such as ASP.NET.

For example, you can push information about the current request on to the NDC.

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3  
A link to example would be useful –  Johnny_D Mar 29 '12 at 8:14
4  
I don't have a link, but think of the situation where you have an ASP.NET application with many simultaneous requests being processed. If you push the request ID (either generated or using some identifier from the request) into the NDC you can then correlate all log messages for a given request through all levels of your application. So now the log messages from your low-level components that don't know anything about ASP.NET can be correlated back to the originating request. –  Jeremy Wiebe Jan 29 '13 at 14:32
    
@Johnny_D, example? link to example below –  Donal Lafferty Nov 21 '13 at 16:48

Want an example?

Take the following Web API written using ASP.NET MVC4:

// GET api/HypervResource
public string Get()
{
    logger.Debug("Start of service test");
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(5000); // simulate work
    logger.Debug("End of service test");
    return "HypervResource controller running, use POST to send JSON encoded RPCs";
}

When server concurrent HTTP Requests are made, the logging can get interleaved. E.g.

2013-06-27 13:28:11,967 [10] DEBUG HypervResource.WmiCalls [(null)] - Start of service test
2013-06-27 13:28:12,976 [12] DEBUG HypervResource.WmiCalls [(null)] - Start of service test
2013-06-27 13:28:14,116 [13] DEBUG HypervResource.WmiCalls [(null)] - Start of service test
2013-06-27 13:28:16,971 [10] DEBUG HypervResource.WmiCalls [(null)] - End of service test
2013-06-27 13:28:17,979 [12] DEBUG HypervResource.WmiCalls [(null)] - End of service test
2013-06-27 13:28:19,119 [13] DEBUG HypervResource.WmiCalls [(null)] - End of service test

In this simple example, you could use the thread id to distinguish requests, but that can get tricky as the log file grows in complexity.

A better alternative is to provide unique identifiers that group together log messages for the same request. We can update the code as to the following:

// GET api/HypervResource
public string Get()
{
    using(log4net.NDC.Push(Guid.NewGuid().ToString()))
    {
        logger.Debug("Start of service test");
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(5000); // simulate work
        logger.Debug("End of service test");
        return "HypervResource controller running, use POST to send JSON encoded RPCs";
    }
}

This produces a log that you can grep to see the issues associated with a specific request. E.g.

2013-06-27 14:04:31,431 [11] DEBUG HypervResource.WmiCalls [525943cb-226a-43c2-8bd5-03c258d58a79] - Start of service test
2013-06-27 14:04:32,322 [12] DEBUG HypervResource.WmiCalls [5a8941ee-6e26-4c1d-a1dc-b4d9b776630d] - Start of service test
2013-06-27 14:04:34,450 [13] DEBUG HypervResource.WmiCalls [ff2246f1-04bc-4451-9e40-6aa1efb94073] - Start of service test
2013-06-27 14:04:36,434 [11] DEBUG HypervResource.WmiCalls [525943cb-226a-43c2-8bd5-03c258d58a79] - End of service test
2013-06-27 14:04:37,325 [12] DEBUG HypervResource.WmiCalls [5a8941ee-6e26-4c1d-a1dc-b4d9b776630d] - End of service test
2013-06-27 14:04:39,453 [13] DEBUG HypervResource.WmiCalls [ff2246f1-04bc-4451-9e40-6aa1efb94073] - End of service test
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These feature come in handy when you have lots of logs to go through. When would you have lots of logs? Diagnosing weird bug on a production system with interleaving outputs. Having more contexts gives you way to filter the output or not outputting unneeded logs.

Another case nested contexts could be useful is if a method or some feature is called several times in different contexts and you need a way to distinguish between them.

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