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Here is an example that I do not understand:

.container_12 .grid_6,
.container_16 .grid_8 {
    width: 460px;
}

It seems to me that width: 460px is applied to all above mentioned classes. But why some classes are separated by coma (,) and some just by space?

I assume that width: 460px will be applied only to those elements which combine classes in the way mentioned in the css file. For example, it will be applied to <div class='container_12 grid_6'> but it will not be applied to the <div class='container_12'>. Is this assumption correct?

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I know this doesn't answer your question but I'd like to offer a recommendation to try SASS. It looks like you're going to have a ton of duplicated CSS, considering the class names. –  Chuck Callebs Jul 27 '10 at 17:01

8 Answers 8

up vote 24 down vote accepted
.container_12 .grid_6,
.container_16 .grid_8 {
    width: 460px;
}

That says "make all .grid_6's within .container_12's and all .grid_8's within .container_16's 460 pixels wide." So both of the following will render the same:

<div class="container_12">
  <div class="grid_6">460px Wide</div>
</div>
<div class="container_16">
  <div class="grid_8">460px Wide</div>
</div>

As for the commas, it's applying one rule to multiple classes, like this.

.blueCheese, .blueBike {
  color:blue;
}

It's functionally equivalent to:

.blueCheese { color:blue }
.blueBike { color:blue }

But cuts down on verbosity.

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1  
I understand that we can apply one rule to several classes separated by comas. It's not clear to me why some classes in the example are not separated by commas. –  Roman Jul 27 '10 at 13:53
3  
When they are separated by a space, it's a nesting issue. The latter are found within the former. So .container_12 .grid_6 is addressing only the .grid_6 items found within .container_12 items. –  Jonathan Sampson Jul 27 '10 at 13:55
.container_12 .grid_6 { ... }

This rule matches a DOM node with class container_12 that has a descendant (not necessarily a child) with class grid_6, and applies the CSS rules to the DOM element with class grid_6.

.container_12 > .grid_6 { ... }

Putting > between them says that the grid_6 node must be a direct child of the node with class container_12.

.container_12, .grid_6 { ... }

A comma, as others have stated, is a way to apply rules to many different nodes at one time. In this case, the rules apply to any node with either a class of container_12 or grid_6.

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Comma groups the classes (applies the same style to them all), an empty space tells that the following selector must be within the first selector.

Therefore

.container_12 .grid_6,
.container_16 .grid_8 {
    width: 460px;
}

applies that style to only class .grid_6 which is within .container_12 class and to .grid_8 class which is within .container_16.

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You have four classes and two selectors in your example:

.container_12 .grid_6,
.container_16 .grid_8 {
    width: 460px;
}

So .container_12 and .grid_6 are both classes, but the rule width: 460px will only be applied to elements that have the .grid_6 class which are descendants of an element that have the .container_16 class.

For example:

<div class="container_16">
<p class=".grid_6">This has a width of 480px.</p>
<p>This has an unknown width.</p>
</div>
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.container_12 .grid_6,
.container_16 .grid_8 {
    width: 460px;
}

width:460px will be only applied to .grid_6 and .grid_8

Edit: Here is a very good article for you

http://css-tricks.com/multiple-class-id-selectors/

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3  
Only if .grid_6 & .grid_8 resides within a .container_12 or .container_16 –  stigok Jul 27 '10 at 13:53
    
@sshow - Thanks. you are right but that is a HTML issue. according to this css code my answer is right –  Jitendra Vyas Jul 27 '10 at 14:00

The above means that you are applying styles to two classes, indicated by the comma.

When you see two elements side by side not separated you can assume that it is referring to an area within an area. So in the above, this style only applies to grid_6 classes inside of container_12 classes and grid_8 classes inside of container_16 classes.

in the example:

<div class="grid_6">This is not effected</div>
<div class="container_12">
  <div class="grid_6">
    This is effected.
  </div>
</div>

The first grid_6 will not be effected while the second grid_6 class will because it is contained inside a container_12.

A statement like

#admin .description p { font-weight:bold; }

Would only apply the bold to

tags within areas that have class "description" that are inside of an area with id "admin", such as:

<div id="admin">
   <div class="description">
      <p>This is bold</p>
   </div>
</div>
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Not exactly what was asked, but maybe this will help.

To apply a style to an element only if it has both classes your selector should use no space between the class names.

For Example:

.class1.class2 { color: #f00; }
.class1 .class2 { color: #0f0; }
.class1, .class2 { font-weight: bold; }

As applied:

<div class='class1 class2'>Bold Red Text</div>

<div class='class1'>Bold Text (not red)</div>

<div class='class1'><div class='class2'>Bold Green Text</div></div>
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The width: 460px; will be applied to the element with the .grid_8 class, contained inside the elements with .container_16 class, and elements with the .grid_6 class, contained inside the elements with .container_12.

The space means heritage, and the comma means 'and'. If you put properties with a selector like
.class-a, .class-b, you will have the properties applied to the elements with anyone of the two classes.

Hope I have helped.

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