Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on a c++ app and I'm facing a problem: I have a class B derived from the abstract class A that has some event handling methods. A third class C is derived from B and must reimplement some of B methods. Is there a way to implicitly call B's method before calling C's one?

Class diagram:

class A
{
    virtual void OnKeyPress(event e)=0;
};
class B : public A
{
    virtual void OnKeyPress(event e)
    {
    print("Keypressed: "+e)
    };
};
class C : public B
{
    void OnKeyPress(event e)
    {
    //DoSomething
    }
}

One of the workaround I figured out is to call the parent's method from C using, say, B::foo() inside C::foo(). This works but it is up to the developer to remember to add the call in the method's body.

The other is to define a new virtual method that the child will override and that the parent will call inside its "OnKeyPress" method.

Thank you, 3mpty.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have to explicitly call the base class method.

class C : public B
{
    virtual void OnKeyPress(event e)
    {
        B::OnKeyPress(e);
        // Do stuff
    }
};

Just re-read your question.....

Best thing to do is to implement method in B that lastly calls an additional protected virtual method to be implemented by C.

i.e.

class B : public A
{
  protected:
       virtual void AdditionalKeyStuff(event e) { }

  public:

    virtual void OnKeyPress(event e)
    {
        // Do B Stuff

        // Finally give decendants a go.
        AdditionalKeyStuff(e)
    }
};


class C : public B
{
  protected:

    virtual void AdditionalKeyStuff(event e)
    {
        // Do only C stuff
    }
};

And you could make the AdditionalKeyStuff(...) in B pure virtual if you want to force any decendants to override it.

share|improve this answer
    
that is just what I wrote on the question :( Anyway, thank you –  3mpty Jul 27 '10 at 14:12
1  
In the second form, B::OnKeyPress() shouldn't be virtual. (Then this becomes the Template Method Pattern, BTW.) –  sbi Jul 27 '10 at 14:25

No. There's no way to have this implicit call.

Plus you gave the two ways to do this in your question!

share|improve this answer

"Almost" the same you have in the question, but separating public class interface and inheritance interface - mighty useful for all kinds of instrumentation:

class A
{
private:

    virtual void DoOnKeyPress( event ) = 0;

    void PreKeyPress( event ) { /* do something */ }
    void PostKeyPress( event ) { /* do something */ }

public:

    virtual ~A() {}

    void OnKeyPress( event e )
    {
        PreKeyPress( e );
        DoOnKeyPress( e );
        PostKeyPress( e );
    }
};

class B : public A
{
private:

    virtual void DoOnKeyPress( event e )
    {
        std::cout << "Keypressed: " << e << std::endl;
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
This is sometimes called the Non Virtual Interface Idiom. +1 from me. –  sbi Jul 27 '10 at 14:24
    
Yes, Sutter covers that in one of his exceptional books. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Jul 27 '10 at 14:43

That is only possible when the method in question is a constructor, and then only happens when the object is constructed. If you can arrange for all the necessary work to be in a constructor you may have something, but it would be very hard to generalise that solution.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried that, but I'm developing for the Bada Os and some things cannot be done in the constructor. –  3mpty Jul 27 '10 at 14:33
    
@3mpty: Bada what? It was not intended as a solution, merely a statement of the only time C++ implicitly calls a base class method, when the subclass method is called. –  Clifford Jul 27 '10 at 19:44
    
I was just saying that in my specific case it is not possible ;) –  3mpty Jul 27 '10 at 21:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.