Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Running a ServiceHost with a single contract is working fine like this:

servicehost = new ServiceHost(typeof(MyService1));
servicehost.AddServiceEndpoint(typeof(IMyService1), new NetTcpBinding(), "net.tcp://127.0.0.1:800/MyApp/MyService1");
servicehost.Open();

Now I'd like to add a second (3rd, 4th, ...) contract. My first guess would be to just add more endpoints like this:

servicehost = new ServiceHost(typeof(MyService1));
servicehost.AddServiceEndpoint(typeof(IMyService1), new NetTcpBinding(), "net.tcp://127.0.0.1:800/MyApp/MyService1");
servicehost.AddServiceEndpoint(typeof(IMyService2), new NetTcpBinding(), "net.tcp://127.0.0.1:800/MyApp/MyService2");
servicehost.Open();

But of course this does not work, since in the creation of ServiceHost I can either pass MyService1 as parameter or MyService2 - so I can add a lot of endpoints to my service, but all have to use the same contract, since I only can provide one implementation?
I got the feeling I'm missing the point, here. Sure there must be some way to provide an implementation for every endpoint-contract I add, or not?

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 44 down vote accepted

You need to implement both services (interfaces) in the same class.

servicehost = new ServiceHost(typeof(WcfEntryPoint));
servicehost.Open(); 

public class WcfEntryPoint : IMyService1, IMyService2
{
    #region IMyService1
    #endregion

    #region IMyService2
    #endregion
}

FYI: I frequently use partial classes to make my host class code easier to read:

// WcfEntryPoint.IMyService1.cs
public partial class WcfEntryPoint : IMyService1
{
    // IMyService1 methods
}

// WcfEntryPoint.IMyService2.cs
public partial class WcfEntryPoint : IMyService2
{
    // IMyService2 methods
}
share|improve this answer
5  
Dang. I need more than just 2 service contracts, I guess 10-50, and for that number this approach is a bit cumbersome - it is not very helpful to have all that entry points in one single class :( Ain't there no other way? –  Sam Dec 3 '08 at 11:13
    
My solution would allow you to break out the contracts into different classes. You could also combine my solution with chill's to have say 5 classes, each with 2 end points. I am very curious though why you need 50 contracts. You should look over Juval's best practices at idesign.net. –  Chris Porter Dec 3 '08 at 15:41
1  
I'll second Chris's comment. It sounds like you need to simplify your design. –  chilltemp Dec 3 '08 at 16:02
2  
Uhm, guys, you are both talking about totally different stuff than me. I need 10-50 contracts because I try to reduce the members per contract to 3-5. You are confusing 'contracts' with 'members' I guess. –  Sam Dec 5 '08 at 10:31
2  
You are talking about having a single service expose up to 250 members over WCF. I would think you should be able to reduce the total count quite a lot if you approach your solution from a different angle. –  Chris Porter Dec 6 '08 at 0:08

I'm currently faced with the same problem, and have decided to go with the implementation below. I'm not sure if there are any performance issues with having this many service contracts, but in my final implementation I will probably have about 10 - 15 service contracts, thus about 10-15 ServiceHosts.

I am hosting all my WCF services inside a single Windows Service.

private void PublishWcfEndpoints()
{
    var mappings = new Dictionary<Type, Type>
    {
       {typeof (IAuthenticationService), typeof (AuthenticationService)},
       {typeof(IUserService), typeof(UserService)},
       {typeof(IClientService), typeof(ClientService)}
    };


    foreach (var type in mappings)
    {
        Type contractType = type.Key;
        Type implementationType = type.Value;

        ServiceHost serviceHost = new ServiceHost(implementationType);
        ServiceEndpoint endpoint = serviceHost.AddServiceEndpoint(contractType, ServiceHelper.GetDefaultBinding(),
                                                                  Properties.Settings.Default.ServiceUrl  + "/" + contractType.Name);
        endpoint.Behaviors.Add(new ServerSessionBehavior());

        ServiceDebugBehavior serviceDebugBehaviour =
            serviceHost.Description.Behaviors.Find<ServiceDebugBehavior>();
        serviceDebugBehaviour.IncludeExceptionDetailInFaults = true;

        log.DebugFormat("Published Service endpoint: {0}", Properties.Settings.Default.ServiceUrl);

        serviceHost.Open();
        serviceHosts.Add(serviceHost);
    }

}

Feel free to comment on this type of set up, and if there are any issues with it, especially performance-related.

share|improve this answer
    
here it goes complicated –  Murhaf Sousli Nov 12 '13 at 16:32
    
Would be even better if you used a dependency injection container to resolve the implementations =) –  Th3B0Y Aug 25 at 11:51

This answer is a further response to the comment in the accepted answer from chilltemp.

Sam, You really should determine why you need 10-50 contracts and try to find another solution. I looked over Juval Lowy's WCF Coding Standards (found on http://www.idesign.net/) and found the following references:

3 Service Contracts ... 4. Avoid contracts with one member. 5. Strive to have three to five members per service contract. 6. Do not have more than twenty members per service contract. Twelve is probably the practical limit.

He doesn't mention a limit on contract implementations (that I can find) but I can't imagine him viewing 50 contracts on a service as anything resembling a best practice. One solution I have found that works well is to use member sharing for similar functions.

For instance, if you are using the WCF service to perform mathematics on 2 values you might have 4 members on the service side: Add(x,y), Subtract(x,y), Multiply(x,y), Divide(x,y). If you combine these into a more generic member and use an object to pass the needed data you can easily reduce your member count and increase scalability. Example: PeformCalculation(obj) where obj has x, y, and action (add, subtract, multiply, divide) properties.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Juval is talking about 3-5 members on a contract. I'm talking about 10-50 contracts to a service (each contract containing 3-5 members). Maybe thats creating the confusion? –  Sam Dec 5 '08 at 10:25
    
Its not confusion, he doesn't mention a limit on contracts but I would not want to go down the road of having 50 contracts on a service. There should be some form of refactoring that could be done on your contracts to reduce the size/count of them. Its your app but I would look for other options. –  Chris Porter Dec 6 '08 at 0:06

I found another solution to for this issue by using a the RoutingService class. Each contract must still be hosted in it's own ServiceHost, but there can be a RoutingService sitting on top of all of them - and presenting them over an unified "endpoint". I've also written a codeproject article about it. The example code is also available on Bitbucket.

share|improve this answer

chili's answer will work if you are ok with the contracts being shared by the service. If you want them to be separated try this:

host1 = new ServiceHost(typeof(MyService1));
host2 = new ServiceHost(typeof(MyService2));

host1.Open();
host2.Open();

public class MyService1 : IMyService1
{
    #region IMyService1
    #endregion
}

public class MyService2 : IMyService2
{
    #region IMyService2
    #endregion
}

Edit: As Matt posted, this would require multiple endpoints for each service/contract

share|improve this answer

What about splitting it up with a base address and multiple services/contracts below it? I am not behind a developmachine right now but something like:

http://myserver/myservices/serviceA
http://myserver/myservices/serviceB
http://myserver/myservices/serviceC

Each service implementing its own ServiceContract.

You can change
public class WcfEntryPoint : IMyService1, IMyService2
to
public partial class WcfEntryPoint : IMyService1
public partial class WcfEntryPoint : IMyService2

Example

share|improve this answer

Maybe this article: "WCF ServiceHost - Single contract multiple endpoints" is what you're looking for.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not looking for "single contract, multiple endpoints", I want "single endpoint, multiple contracts". So what I'm looking for is the other way round. –  Sam Dec 3 '08 at 11:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.