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I'd like to call a function in python using a dictionary.

Here is some code:

d = dict(param='test')

def f(param):
    print param

f(d)

This prints {'param': 'test'} but I'd like it to just print test.

I'd like it to work similarly for more parameters:

d = dict(p1=1, p2=2)
def f2(p1,p2):
    print p1, p2
f2(d)

Is this possible?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 136 down vote accepted

Figured it out for myself in the end. It is simple, I was just missing the ** operator to unpack the dictionary

So my example becomes:

d = dict(p1=1, p2=2)
def f2(p1,p2):
    print p1, p2
f2(**d)
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S.Lott: This is not possible. –  Aaron Digulla Dec 2 '08 at 17:02
10  
if you'd want this to help others, you should rephrase your question: the problem wasn't passing a dictionary, what you wanted was turning a dict into keyword parameters –  Javier Dec 2 '08 at 17:28
7  
It's worth noting that you can also unpack lists to positional arguments: f2(*[1,2]) –  Matthew Trevor Dec 2 '08 at 23:44
7  
"dereference": the usual term, in this Python context, is "unpack". :) –  mipadi Jul 2 '09 at 18:05
    
thanks, i love python :) –  Saša Šijak Mar 16 '12 at 8:13

In python, this is called "unpacking", and you can find a bit about it in the tutorial. The documentation of it sucks, I agree, especially because of how fantasically useful it is.

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1  
This link is dead now. You might want to update the answer. –  Sony Kadavan Apr 28 at 14:40
1  
yeesh, that's annoying. Thanks for letting me know, fixed. –  llimllib Apr 28 at 21:24

Please find a short explanation in next tutorial: http://docs.python.org/2.7/tutorial/controlflow.html#unpacking-argument-lists

" * works for list and ** for dictionary "

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Here ya go - works just any other iterable:

d = {'param' : 'test'}

def f(dictionary):
    for key in dictionary:
        print key

f(d)
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It seems that people are downvoting this as it answered the original question, not the rephrased question. I suggest just removing this post now. –  dotancohen Dec 10 '13 at 8:00
    
@dotancohen no it was never correct, it fails the second block of code that was always with the question. It took it too literally, the print was an example. –  Dave Hillier Feb 26 at 21:28

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