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Can someone show me some html to layout the following not using tables?

______________________________________
|_______|_____________|               |
|_______|_____________|_______________|
|_______|_____________|               |
|_______|_____________|               |
|_______|_____________|_______________|

The third column needs to span the first two "rows" and then span the next three "rows" The first "column" needs to have the same width

I ask this because of the whole "Tables are dead for layout" argument

UPDATE: the content of the markup has checkboxes, textboxes, and textareas

CONCLUSION:

This has been very enlightening. I believe I have been cleared up with this philosophical question.

It seems to me that the general rule should be: Don't use tables for your entire website, if there are sections that look like a table, then use a table. Extremes of "NEVER USE A TABLE" seems impractical and theoretical. Likewise, excessive use of tables makes maintenance difficult, and dealing with 4-deep nested tables can be a real pain.

So because the layout above "looks like a table" I'm going to use a table. :)

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2  
Is this for layout or for tabular data? –  Pekka 웃 Jul 27 '10 at 18:24
21  
Regarding the "tables are dead for layout" thing: that's not quite true. Tables are still perfectly fine when you're using them to lay out tabular data, and tabular data is more common than you might think. Additionally, the reason you don't use tables is to promote semantic html. CSS styling and layout isn't the end in itself; it's merely a mechanism to improved semantics. If you have a situation where a simple table can express the design more semantically than a bunch of divs, then go for it. –  Joel Coehoorn Jul 27 '10 at 18:24
    
this is a perfect example of the intended use of a table. –  Fosco Jul 27 '10 at 18:30
    
You're asking how to make a table in html without using tabs? ;) What you described looks like a table to me. So make it a table. –  jalf Jul 27 '10 at 18:31
    
Absolute positioning within a relative container... FTW! –  Josh Stodola Jul 27 '10 at 21:05

9 Answers 9

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Even if the content isn't tabular, use a table if you need to. Most of the arguments against using a table for layout are purely theoretical (are you really planning on offering more than one stylesheet for your site, for example? Do you care how your form appears semantically?) Sometimes, especially in the larger layout issues for a site, tables work much better than CSS.

Use what works.

Tables were often abused for layout, and most of them can be scrapped in favor of a simpler CSS layout. but occasionally, tables are the better tool.

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1  
I think you misunderstand the benefits of CSS. Css is not about offering more than one stylesheet for your site, its about making your code a) more efficient, b) easier to read, and c) easier to maintain. Tables are wonderful for displaying tabular data, but they are inefficient for styling and make basic site maintenance impossible. –  Stargazer712 Jul 27 '10 at 18:29
    
I agree that CSS is better than tables for layout. Almost always. But very occasionally you need to create a layout that is easy to express as a table, and is a PITA to do in CSS, or requires you to add extra divs, etc. CSS layouts can also be difficult to maintain. I'm not arguing against CSS, I'm all for it. I just don't think a dogmatic "no tables for layout" attitude is best. –  Ned Batchelder Jul 27 '10 at 18:31
    
Yes, we often do offer multiple style sheets and do care about proper semantics (not to mention SEO and Accessibility) –  DA. Jul 27 '10 at 20:58
    
@DA: it sounds like you definitely want to use CSS as much as absolutely possible. –  Ned Batchelder Jul 27 '10 at 21:10

I completely agree with not using tables for laying out your page. However the diagram above actually looks like a table so you might want to use one.

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I think for your purpose you should use a table, but since you don't want that... here's something I made quickly using only <div>s: http://jsfiddle.net/HEfTE/1/

You didn't mention how and where the checkboxes, textboxes, and textareas will be used, so I'm not sure how to incorporate them in my example. But if you post some more information, it won't be difficult to add them in there.

Hope that helps!

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Your clear class needs a couple things to be happy in every browser: especially overflow:hidden and font-size:0 in IE6/7 –  Bob Fincheimer Jul 28 '10 at 12:35
    
oh. I didn't know that... thanks! –  Hristo Jul 28 '10 at 12:41

These components seem to form a table...so, I'd use a table.

The following is not a table, so don't use a table to lay that out. (Use <div> instead obviously)

--------------------------------
|                              |
|                              |
|------------------------------|
|         |                    |
|         |                    |
|         |                    |
|         |                    |
|         |                    |
|         |                    |
|         |                    |
|         |                    |
|         |                    |
--------------------------------

Do you see the difference between your example and mine?

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There's not enough information to answer your question. Like Pekka said, is it a table or not?

Is it a form? I'm assuming so, if it has textboxes, textareas, etc. If it's a form, you could use a container for the two left columns and one for the right.

<style type="text/css">

div#formLeft {
    float: left;
}

textarea {
   display: block;
}

</style>

<div id="formLeft">
    <label>Form Field 1</label><input type="text" /><br />
    <label>Form Field 2</label><input type="text" /><br />
    <label>Form Field 3</label><input type="text" /><br />
    <label>Form Field 4</label><input type="text" /><br />
    <label>Form Field 5</label><input type="text" /><br />
</div>

<div id="formRight">
    <textarea></textarea>
    <textarea></textarea>
</div>

Now, obviously there is a lot more need to be done, but this the bare bones.

Recommendations? Style label with a fixed width to keep it looking tabular. Of course adjust the heights and everything to make it fit. Since the boxes on the right, which I assume are textareas, just give them IDs and heights.

I took a screenshot to help visualize my code without actually entering it in. This is how I assume your layout is, but of course you can easily add other columns. Just make the formLeft ID turn into a class and throw in another!

alt text

Edit: Image uploaded at image shack. I can't guarantee how long it'll be there.

Good luck!

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The problem with this implementation is that the textareas on the right aren't positioned correctly as I asked. The only solution I've seen to remedy that is specifying actual pixel height and widths, which I don't believe is good practice. Thanks for your comment though. –  Jose Jul 28 '10 at 12:26
    
Unfortunately if you want every browser to look the same, explicity height and widths for form elements are inevitable. Inputs, textareas, selects, etc. are horribly difficult to get to look the same without some very explicity CSS –  Bob Fincheimer Jul 28 '10 at 12:37
    
Specifying heights and widths is good practice. It is always a positive thing to define shape and size for elements on your site, so user agent stylesheets never change something in differen browsers. Just to be clear, you are styling them through CSS. It is still presentation separated content, whereas using tables for that layout breaks it. Also, tables are MORE complex for this layout than practical, as you can see how clean, short, and semantic the code I provided was. –  Tarik Jul 28 '10 at 15:46
    
@Bob: I personally do not develop for older browsers, but if cross compatibility is a problem, there is no stopping him from making a div class for each row. –  Tarik Jul 28 '10 at 15:47

You can do it with DIV's with careful use of float: right, float: left, and clear: both.

I agree with you that what you describe is not tabular, and using DIV's may have advantages, such as they may be able to flow better when viewed, say, on a mobile device (especially if you give them a different stylesheet).

However, I should say that using DIV's for stuff like this is a great big pain, and I usually use tables for it because it is so easy and they do a lot better job of sizing the columns and such to fit the content.

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I'd do it similar to this (in the absence of any details, I threw in some sample elements):

<html>
    <head>
        <style type="text/css">
            * { margin: 0; padding: 0; }
            #form {
                width: 400px;
                margin: 10px;
            }
            #textareas {
                width: 145px;
                float: right;
            }
            #textareas textarea {
                width: 145px;
                margin-bottom: 3px;
            }
            #textareas #textarea1 {
                height: 43px;
            }
            #textareas #textarea2 {
                height: 66px;
            }
            .forminput {
                height: 23px;
                width: 250px;
            }
            .forminput span {
                display: block;
                float: left;
                width: 75px;
            }
            .forminput input {
                width: 175px;
            }
        </style>
    </head>

    <body>
        <div id="form">
            <div id="textareas">
                <textarea id="textarea1"></textarea>
                <textarea id="textarea2"></textarea>
            </div>
            <div class="forminput">
                <span>Label 1</span>
                <input type="text" />
            </div>
            <div class="forminput">
                <span>Label 2</span>
                <input type="text" />
            </div>
            <div class="forminput">
                <span>Label 3</span>
                <input type="text" />
            </div>
            <div class="forminput">
                <span>Label 4</span>
                <input type="text" />
            </div>
            <div class="forminput">
                <span>Label 5</span>
                <input type="text" />
            </div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

You can always do it without a table.

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1  
Please use actual LABEL tags for your labels. –  DA. Jul 27 '10 at 21:04

Forms can be considered tabular data. Not everyone agrees on that, but enough do that I'd call it a 50/50 decision. Flip a coin in this case.

My bigger concern is that a form with multiple columns and multiple rows and fields spanning multiple rows begins to sound like a poorly laid out form design to me. It may make perfect sense in this case, but without more context, it's really hard to say what's best here.

If there are direct relationships between the form elements in each row/column, knowing that may help us answer the question for you.

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To answer your question of relationship, yes the first row on the third column is related to the first two rows, as is the 2nd row on third column related to the last 3 rows. –  Jose Jul 28 '10 at 12:46

What is the content? Tabular data? If so use a table.

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No its a form it has text inputs, checkboxes, the right column have textareas –  Jose Jul 27 '10 at 18:25
1  
Can you show a detailed diagram? –  meder Jul 27 '10 at 18:25
    
Gut reaction is that would be a poorly laid out form. That said, there's no reason forms can't be considered tabular data. There's no wrong/right answer to this in this context. A table is likely OK, as would a CSS layout. But to truly answer the question, we'd need a lot more context...specifically the relation of the form elements to each other. –  DA. Jul 27 '10 at 20:59

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