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I have Perl on Mac, Windows and Ubuntu. How can I tell from within the script which one is which? Thanks in advance.

Edit: I was asked what I am doing. It is a script, part of our cross-platform build system. The script recurses directories and figures out what files to build. Some files are platform-specific, and thus, on Linux I don't want to build the files ending with _win.cpp, etc.

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1  
Why do you need to know? [There may be a more appropriate answer to your question, depending on what (if anything) it is you're doing that's platform-dependant.] –  Rob Dec 3 '08 at 3:57

9 Answers 9

up vote 57 down vote accepted

Examine the $^O variable which will contain the name of the operating system:

print "$^O\n";

Which prints linux on Linux and MSWin32 on Windows.

You can also refer to this variable by the name $OSNAME if you use the English module:

use English qw' -no_match_vars ';
print "$OSNAME\n";

According to perlport, $^O will be darwin on Mac OS X.


You can also use the Config core module, which can provide the same information (and a lot more):

use Config;

print "$Config{osname}\n";
print "$Config{archname}\n";

Which on my Ubuntu machine prints:

linux
i486-linux-gnu-thread-multi

Note that this information is based on the system that Perl was built, which is not necessarily the system Perl is currently running on (the same is true for $^O and $OSNAME); the OS won't likely be different but some information, like the architecture name, may very well be.

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Thanks :) And for other people who may use this answer, cygwin perl returns "cygwin", so there are two possibilities for Windows. –  mxcl Dec 2 '08 at 23:36
2  
More than two; there's was a dos port, and the os2 port used to be able to run on windows. All possible values of $^O are in theory documented in <perldoc.perl.org/perlport.html>;. –  ysth Dec 3 '08 at 2:55
    
print "$^O\n"; does indeed print "darwin" on my Mac OS X sysem. –  ShreevatsaR Dec 3 '08 at 3:26
    
@ysth typo in your link by the way –  thecoshman Dec 13 '12 at 11:35
    
The typo comes from the trailing angle bracket. It should be perldoc.perl.org/perlport.html. –  Alan Dec 21 '12 at 15:31

If you need more specific information on Windows this may help.

my $osname = $^O;


if( $osname eq 'MSWin32' ){{
  eval { require Win32; } or last;
  $osname = Win32::GetOSName();

  # work around for historical reasons
  $osname = 'WinXP' if $osname =~ /^WinXP/;
}}

Derived from sysinfo.t, which I wrote the original version.

If you need more detailed information:

my ( $osvername, $major, $minor, $id ) = Win32::GetOSVersion();
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Sys::Info::OS looks like a relatively clean potential solution, but currently doesn't seem to support Mac. It shouldn't be too much work to add that though.

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This would have been a better answer, if only it would support Mac. I prefer the compiler-aided functions, to the maintenance-problem strings. –  mxcl Dec 2 '08 at 23:35
    

The variable $^O (that's a capital 'O', not a zero) holds the name of the operating system.

Depending on what you want, it may or may not give the answer you want - on my system it gives 'linux' without saying which distro. I'm not so sure about what it says on Windows or MacOS.

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Here's a quick reference on how to find the OS the local machine is running from Perl.

The $^O variable ($OSTYPE if you use English) contains the operating system that your perl binary was built for.

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Look inside the source for File::Spec to see how it loads the right delegate based on the operating system. :)

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A classic one-liner:

my $windows=($^O=~/Win/)?1:0;# Are we running on windows?
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4  
Except if you're running darwin os ! –  user392408 Apr 12 '12 at 0:28
    
Crap! You're right! Making it case sensitive seems to fix it. I've corrected it above. Good catch! –  Hawk Sep 16 '12 at 15:50
#Assign the $home_directory variable the path of the user's home directory
my $home_directory = ($^O eq /Win/) ? $ENV{HOMEPATH} : $ENV{HOME};
#Then you can read/write to files in the home directory
open(FILE, ">$home_directory/my_tmp_file");
print FILE "This is a test\n";
close FILE;
#And/or read the contents of the file
open(FILE, "<$home_directory/my_tmp_file");
while (<FILE>){
    print $_;
}
close FILE;
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yes using Config module can be a good thing. One more possibility is getting the info from /etc/*release files

for eg..

cat /etc/os-release

NAME="UBUNTU"
VERSION="12.0.2 LTS, Precise Pangolin"
ID="UBUNTU"
ID_LIKE=debian
PRETTY_NAME="Ubuntu precise (12.0.2 LTS)"
VERSION_ID="12.04"
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And what about windows? –  M42 Sep 2 '13 at 9:17
    
@M42 use Win32; #module to interact with the win32 API.<br/> Win32::GetOSName() - will return the OS name<br/> Win32::GetOSVersion()<br/> [CORE] Returns the list (STRING, MAJOR, MINOR, BUILD, ID), where the elements are, respectively: An arbitrary descriptive string, the major version number of the operating system, the minor version number, the build number, and a digit indicating the actual operating system.<br/>You will get such o/p<br/> <s21.postimg.org/ymuhihbsn/win32_os_info_perl.jpg><br/>; for more info abot Win32 module : <br/><search.cpan.org/~jdb/Win32-0.47/Win32.pm>; –  Raj S Sep 11 '13 at 8:33
    
Sure, but there isn't such file as /etc/os-release and you don't know in advance on which platform you are. –  M42 Sep 11 '13 at 8:37
    
Hi @M42, Unix and DOS family have many things different. –  Raj S Sep 12 '13 at 7:32
    
I think you didn't understand the question. It asks: "How can I detect the operating system in Perl?". Your solution doesn't answer. –  M42 Sep 12 '13 at 7:36

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