Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

After learning about TDD and unit testing, I'm really looking to write tests when I code, preferably before I code because I see the benefits coding in Python. I'm developing a website, and I'm trying to write tests according to the requirements, but its proving more difficult than expected.

I can see the benefits of writing tests when you're producing a library of code with a public interface for others to use. Developing a website, where there is really not much logic, and mostly Reading and Writing against a database seems a little harder to unit test. Mostly, I have to create/edit/delete rows in the database.

I'm using a framework (Kohana 3 for php), so 99% of all the libraries and helpers that I'm going to be using have already been tested (hopefully), so what else is their to write tests for?

I'm mostly talking about scripting languages, not about CSS or HTML, I already know about cross-browser testing.

How much can you really test when developing a web site, and how should you go about it?

Edit: Is the lack of activity on this question a sign? I understand that certain things MUST be tested, like security and the like, but how much can be written using unit tests and TDD is the question.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Which languages are you using? PHP? –  John Saunders Jul 27 '10 at 19:31
    
Yes sir. That, and I'm using a framework to make life a little easier. –  BDuelz Jul 27 '10 at 19:32
    
@user156814 "Is the lack of activity on this question proof that I'm right?" In this case, what you're saying is so essentially wrong that it defies our ability to correct the misconceptions. If your application does anything, then that thing it does is testable. It makes no sense to claim that nothing testable is being done. If that was true, why write code? –  S.Lott Jul 27 '10 at 21:01
    
I wasn't saying that it wasnt testable, obviously there are ways to test for almost anything. I was asking how much would unit tests really help in this situation, unless I was writing a library of code for the site? –  BDuelz Jul 27 '10 at 21:07
    
@user156814: I still don't understand your question. "there are ways to test for almost anything" That means there are unit tests for everything. Every "feature" -- every line of code you wrote -- everything is testable as a discrete unit. "how much would unit tests really help"? I can't understand the question, since every unit of code you personally wrote must be tested. How can you write software without testing every unit you wrote? What are you asking? –  S.Lott Jul 27 '10 at 22:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Developing a website, where there is really not much logic, and mostly Reading and Writing against a database seems a little harder to unit test. Mostly, I have to create/edit/delete rows in the database.

Not completely true.

You have data model processing. Does the validation work? Do the calculations on the reported rows from the database work?

You have control, sequence and navigation among pages -- do the links work? The test setup will provide a logged-in-user. The test will (1) do a GET or a POST to fetch a page, then (2) confirm the page actually loaded and has the right stuff.

You have authorization -- who can do what? Each distinct test setup will provide a different logged-in-user. The tests will (1) attempt a GET or POST to process a page. Some tests will (2) confirm they got directed to error-response pages. Some tests will (2) confitrm that the GET or POST worked.

You have content on the page -- what data was fetched? The test setup will provide a logged-in-user. The test will (1) do a GET or a POST to fetch a page, then (2) confirm the page actually loaded and has the right stuff.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand all that, but how much of that can be unit tested? i can see testing validation and authentication, but how do you test if links work using unit tests? –  BDuelz Jul 27 '10 at 20:18
    
Maybe your use of "test unit" is confusing here. Everything needs to be tested, and a fundamental aspect of the 'net is that it's OS-agnostic. Get yerself a computer, load up your site, and see if it works. That's as good of a test unit as you'll need. –  eykanal Jul 27 '10 at 21:26
4  
@eykanal: "load up your site, and see if it works". Vague, unrepeatable and not automated. If you wrote a unit of code for the site, you must test that unit of code -- in isolation. It can't be any simpler. If you wrote it, you must make a discrete unit of it and test it. That's all. –  S.Lott Jul 27 '10 at 22:33
    
+1. I get what your saying now. –  BDuelz Jul 27 '10 at 22:59
1  
@S.Lott: I think the statement "mock the database is usually silly" is an overstatement. I don't do much web development, but I found that using something like a Repository to mediate the access to the database helps a lot: it gives you something to unit test, and you can test it with a mock so that you don't have to work against a real database. –  Mathias Jul 28 '10 at 7:32

Have you tried Selenium? It allows you to automatically do almost anything in a web browser. For example, you could have it go through and click all of the links and make sure that they go to the correct url.

It works with multiple languages, including python and allows for testing in chrome, firefox, ie, and other browsers.

share|improve this answer
1  
Just a dissenting opinion: blog.objectmentor.com/articles/2010/01/04/… –  apollodude217 Jul 29 '10 at 16:36

If your site contains many forms, how do you write them? Do you write each view using plain HTML? Or do you write your own form helpers that generate forms just the way you want them? If you do that, you may find that unit-testing your form generators makes it easier to write them.

In general, if your program is mostly CRUD, look out for ways to automate CRUD management; write your own custom CRUD generator. Which does not mean write the CRUD framework that will end all frameworks; that would be too much work. Just write a generator for the small things you need for your current application. TDD will help you there.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.