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im reading a csv file and then writing a new one:

import csv

with open('thefile.csv', 'rb') as f:
  data = list(csv.reader(f))

import collections
counter = collections.defaultdict(int)
for row in data:
    counter[row[11]] += 1

writer = csv.writer(open('/pythonwork/thefile_subset1.csv', 'w'))
for row in data:
    if counter[row[11]] >= 500:
       writer.writerow(row)

for some reason i cannot get the csv.writer to close the file. when i open the file it opens it as READ ONLY because it says that is still open.

how do i close thefile_subset1.csv after i am done with it?

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5 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted
with open('/pythonwork/thefile_subset1.csv', 'w') as outfile:
    writer = csv.writer(outfile)
    for row in data:
        if counter[row[11]] >= 500:
           writer.writerow(row)
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You can break out the open command into its own variable, so that you can close it later.

f = open('/pythonwork/thefile_subset1.csv', 'w')
writer = csv.writer(f)
f.close()

csv.writer throws a ValueError if you try to write to a closed file.

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1  
It would be better to use another with statement, as was used to read the data in to begin with. –  Will McCutchen Jul 27 '10 at 21:12
    
Agreed. I have to get into the habit of using with myself. –  Donald Miner Jul 27 '10 at 21:31
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Look at the difference:

with open('thefile.csv', 'rb') as f:
    data = list(csv.reader(f))

vs:

writer = csv.writer(open('/pythonwork/thefile_subset1.csv', 'w'))
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so what is the answer>? this is confusing –  Yuck Jul 27 '10 at 21:34
    
Doesn't answer the question –  Rafal Ziolkowski Oct 31 '12 at 14:33
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close the file, not the csv writer. To do this, you'll need to open the file first before instantiating your writer rather than keeping it all in one line.

import csv
import collections

with open('thefile.csv', 'rb') as f:
    data = list(csv.reader(f))

counter = collections.defaultdict(int)
for row in data:
    counter[row[11]] += 1

f.close()  # good idea to close if you're done with it

fSubset = open('/pythonwork/thefile_subset1.csv', 'w')
writer = csv.writer(fSubset)
for row in data:
    if counter[row[11]] >= 500:
        writer.writerow(row)

fSubset.close()

Also, I would suggest keeping your imports at the top of the script and closing the first file when you're done with it.

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Force the writer to clean up:

del writer
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1  
-1 There's no guarantee that the cleanup action will happen immediately (it depends on which implementation of Python you're using). –  Greg Hewgill Jul 27 '10 at 21:00
    
Where is that documented? –  James Roth Jul 27 '10 at 21:02
2  
The del statement only removes the name binding: "Deletion of a name removes the binding of that name from the local or global namespace, depending on whether the name occurs in a global statement in the same code block." It doesn't say anything about when cleanup might happen. –  Greg Hewgill Jul 27 '10 at 21:04
1  
-1 The upvoters of this answer should be ashamed –  gnibbler Jul 27 '10 at 21:27
1  
+1 Only answer that fixes my problem. All the others are retroactive (i.e. here's what you should do in the future). Should be noted that you should call gc.collect() immediately afterward for manually starting garbage collection. –  Muhd Aug 23 '12 at 21:17
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