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Bret Taylor discussed the SchemaLess Design in this blog post: http://bret.appspot.com/entry/how-friendfeed-uses-mysql

It looks like they stored different class's Objects into only one table.Then build more index tables.

my question is that how to build index on one class.

for example, a user's blog is {id,userid,title,body}. A user's tweet is {id,userid,tweet}.

If I want to build an index for users' blogs how can I do?

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You may want to look at document databases. These allow you to store entire documents as well, just like FriendFeed does, but the database takes care of all the indexing for you. –  Niels van der Rest Jul 28 '10 at 7:10

2 Answers 2

It's very simple -- perhaps simpler than you expect.

When you store a blog entity, you're going to insert to the main entities table of course. A blog goes like this:

CREATE TABLE entities (
  id INT AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
  entity_json TEXT NOT NULL
);

INSERT INTO entities (id, entity_json) VALUES (DEFAULT,
    '{userid: 8675309, 
      post_date: "2010-07-27", 
      title: "MySQL is NoSQL", 
      body: ... }'
);

You also insert into a separate index table for each logical type of attribute. Using your example, the userid for a blog is not the same as a userid for a tweet. Since you just inserted a blog, you then insert into index table(s) for blog attribute(s):

CREATE TABLE blog_userid (
  id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
  userid BIGINT UNSIGNED,
  KEY (userid, id)
);

INSERT INTO blog_userid (id, userid) VALUES (LAST_INSERT_ID(), 8675309);

CREATE TABLE blog_date (
  id INT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
  post_date DATETIME UNSIGNED,
  KEY (post_date, id)
);

INSERT INTO blog_date (id, post_date) VALUES (LAST_INSERT_ID(), '2010-07-27');

Don't insert into any tweet index tables, because you just created a blog, not a tweet.

You know all rows in blog_userid reference blogs, because that's how you inserted them. So you can search for blogs of a given user:

SELECT e.*
FROM blog_userid u JOIN entities e ON u.id = e.id
WHERE u.userid = 86765309;

Re your comment:

Yes, you could add real columns to the entities table for any attributes that you know apply to all content types. For example:

CREATE TABLE entities (
  id INT AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
  entity_type INT NOT NULL,
  creation_date TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
  entity_json TEXT NOT NULL
);

The columns for entity_type and creation_date would allow you to crawl the entities in chronological order (or reverse chronological order) and know which set of index tables matches the entity type of a given row.

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But accroding to the article. sometimes they can crawl the entity table to build a new index or modify the old index. I think may be can add a new key-value “type":"blog" or "type":"tweet" into the blob. Is there any better suggestion? –  user404017 Jul 28 '10 at 6:42

They do not store objects of different classes in the same table. The 'entities' table they are referring to is used to store only one kind of entities.

For example, a typical entity in FriendFeed might look like this:

"id": "71f0c4d2291844cca2df6f486e96e37c",
"user_id": "f48b0440ca0c4f66991c4d5f6a078eaf",
"feed_id": "f48b0440ca0c4f66991c4d5f6a078eaf",
"title": "We just launched a new backend system for FriendFeed!",
"link": "http://friendfeed.com/e/71f0c4d2-2918-44cc-a2df-6f486e96e37c",
"published": 1235697046,
"updated": 1235697046,

To understand the implementation better, have a look at the example given here: https://github.com/jamesgolick/friendly#readme

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I believe that's exactly what they do (store objects of different types in the same table). If you look at the link from the original post it says 'our entities are stored in A TABLE that looks like this.... TABLE entities'. The entity content you give an example of is contained in the body field of the entities table. I think that's the whole point of the design, am I missing something? –  riley Jul 3 '12 at 21:59
    
Yes you're missing something. Its one type of entity. They use the schema-less design so they can add & remove columns without locking the table. All entities are the same with the exception of entities that existed before a field were added do not have that particular field in their JSON. –  Josh Ribakoff Jul 14 '13 at 16:05

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