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I have an app.config file that I need to distribute with my application. It was created because of a Service Reference to an ASMX web service I added.

It isn't a huge deal if this file is modified/viewed, but I still would like to make it secure. I already check the hash of the config and make sure it is valid, but I still want an added layer of protection.

Here is my config: http://pastie.org/private/zjdzadnfwrjvwkmlbdsqw

So is there anything in there that I can encrypt or anything?

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stackoverflow.com/questions/855483/… might help –  PRR Jul 28 '10 at 8:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 20 down vote accepted

You cannot encrypt the entire <system.serviceModel> - it's a configuration section group, which contains configuration sections.

The aspnet_regiis will only encrypt configuration sections - so you need to selectively encrypt those parts you need, like this:

cd C:\WINDOWS\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50727
aspnet_regiis.exe -pef "system.serviceModel/bindings" .
aspnet_regiis.exe -pef "system.serviceModel/services" .

etc.

With this, you can encrypt what you need easily - what isn't too important, can be left in clear text.

Word of warning: since it's aspnet_regiis, it expects to be dealing with a web.config file - copy your app.config to a location and call it web.config, encrypt your sections, and copy those encrypted sections back into your own app.config.

Or write your own config section encrypter/decrypter - it's really just a few lines of code! Or use mine - I wrote a small ConfigSectionCrypt utility, come grab it off my OneDrive - with full source (C# - .NET 3.5 - Visual Studio 2008). It allows you to encrypt and decrypt sections from any config file - just specify the file name on the command line.

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4  
+1 for targeting the exact need of the question –  John K Jul 28 '10 at 4:59
    
Excellent! Just the answer I was seeking. Your command line app did the job and I will tuck it away for future use. Thanks for the help! –  Eaton Jul 28 '10 at 14:24
    
The skydrive link seems to be down. Any other way we can get the command line utility? –  M.R. May 7 at 20:39
    
@M.R.: sorry 'bout that - updated the link to point to the "new" OneDrive location –  marc_s May 7 at 20:45
    
The OneDrive file is reported as Malicious by Chrome and blocked. –  Jay Greene Aug 25 at 20:09

You can encrypt sections of an App.Config or Web.Config, there's a heap of blog entries which cover this in detail:

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/dotnet/EncryptingTheAppConfig.aspx

http://weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/archive/2006/01/09/434893.aspx

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dtkwfdky.aspx

http://odetocode.com/blogs/scott/archive/2006/01/08/encrypting-custom-configuration-sections.aspx

Here's the MSDN version: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/89211k9b%28VS.80%29.aspx

Here's one for how to encrypt via code: http://davidhayden.com/blog/dave/archive/2006/03/14/2883.aspx

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I've tried a few, but none of them relate to the service model settings. –  Eaton Jul 28 '10 at 3:10

Well the file will be read by the program when it is run so changing the file could be a bad idea, you could add checksums to each line to make sure it's valid by checking it in your application or checking for modifications since last run or something. I've never heard of encrypting an app.config before to be honest.

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I mainly would like to hide the URL to my licensing script in some way. I know that no desktop encryption method will completely restrict someone from viewing it, but I would like to hide it from the standard user. –  Eaton Jul 28 '10 at 3:04
    
you can use some kind of ROT encryption and in your app you can decrypt it, ROT encryption is simply just character shifiting like using a standard shift like 2 a string that is "abc" becomes "cde" you can use much more complicated methods though but it's up to you on how much security you need. –  Jesus Ramos Jul 28 '10 at 3:15

I use the following to encrypt my connection strings in web.config, why not use the same for yourself. I am not sure though.

To Encrypt:

C:\WINDOWS\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50727\aspnet_regiis.exe -pef "connectionStrings" "\myWebSitePath"

To Decrypt:

C:\WINDOWS\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50727\aspnet_regiis.exe -pdf "connectionStrings" "\myWebsitePath" 

Put them in bat files so you can encrypt or decrypt on the fly.

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They aren't connection strings, so that wouldn't work for this. –  Eaton Jul 28 '10 at 3:11

It isn't a huge deal if this file is modified/viewed...

In that case, what is the security for?

You can programmatically encrypt sections of a config file with SectionInformation.ProtectSection.

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Just to keep the URL out of sight from the standard user. –  Eaton Jul 28 '10 at 3:09
    
I just don't want it to be plain text. –  Eaton Jul 28 '10 at 3:10
    
SectionInformation.ProtectSection seems to be the easier solution, why go with the separate aspnet_regiis utility? –  Cahit Mar 22 '11 at 1:37

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