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I know the title sounds familiar as there are many similar questions, but I'm asking for a different aspect of the problem (I know the difference between having things on the stack and putting them on the heap).

In Java I can always return references to "local" objects

public Thing calculateThing() {
    Thing thing = new Thing();
    // do calculations and modify thing
    return thing;
}

In C++, to do something similar I have 2 options

(1) I can use references whenever I need to "return" an object

void calculateThing(Thing& thing) {
    // do calculations and modify thing
}

Then use it like this

Thing thing;
calculateThing(thing);

(2) Or I can return a pointer to a dynamically allocated object

Thing* calculateThing() {
    Thing* thing(new Thing());
    // do calculations and modify thing
    return thing;
}

Then use it like this

Thing* thing = calculateThing();
delete thing;

Using the first approach I won't have to free memory manually, but to me it makes the code difficult to read. The problem with the second approach is, I'll have to remember to delete thing;, which doesn't look quite nice. I don't want to return a copied value because it's inefficient (I think), so here come the questions

  • Is there a third solution (that doesn't require copying the value)?
  • Is there any problem if I stick to the first solution?
  • When and why should I use the second solution?
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4  
+1 for nicely putting the question. –  Kangkan Jul 28 '10 at 6:27
2  
(2) is all wrong.You are returning the address of a temporary which has been constructed from a pointer to a dynamically allocated Thing. I would normally consider it bad design to allow a Thing* to be implicitly converted to a Thing. –  Charles Bailey Jul 28 '10 at 6:39
    
Hi Charles, I made a mistake, and I believe I've edited to fix that. –  phunehehe Jul 28 '10 at 6:41
    
Yes. That looks better. –  Charles Bailey Jul 28 '10 at 6:51
    
To be very pedantic, it's a bit imprecise to say that "functions return something". More correctly, evaluating a function call produces a value. The value is always an object (unless it's a void function). The distinction is whether the value is a glvalue or a prvalue -- which is determined by whether declared return type is a reference or not. –  Kerrek SB Mar 4 at 0:07

7 Answers 7

up vote 47 down vote accepted

I don't want to return a copied value because it's inefficient

Prove it.

Look up RVO and NRVO, and in C++0x move-semantics. In most cases in C++03, an out parameter is just a good way to make your code ugly, and in C++0x you'd actually be hurting yourself by using an out parameter.

Just write clean code, return by value. If performance is a problem, profile it (stop guessing), and find what you can do to fix it. It likely won't be returning things from functions.


That said, if you're dead set on writing like that, you'd probably want to do the out parameter. It avoids dynamic memory allocation, which is safer and generally faster. It does require you have some way to construct the object prior to calling the function, which doesn't always make sense for all objects.

If you want to use dynamic allocation, the least that can be done is put it in a smart pointer. (This should be done all the time anyway) Then you don't worry about deleting anything, things are exception-safe, etc. The only problem is it's likely slower than returning by value anyway!

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7  
@phunehehe: No point is speculating, you should profile your code and find out. (Hint: no.) Compilers are very smart, they aren't going to waste time copying things around if they don't have to. Even if copying cost something, you should still strive for good code over fast code; good code is easy to optimize when speed becomes a problem. No point in uglying up code for something you have no idea is a problem; especially if you actually slow it down or get nothing out of it. And if you're using C++0x, move-semantics make this a non-issue. –  GManNickG Jul 28 '10 at 6:40
1  
@GMan, re: RVO: actually this is only true if your caller and callee happen to be in the same compilation unit, which in real world it isn't most of the time. So, you are in for disappointment if your code isn't all templated (in which case it will all be in one compilation unit) or you have some link-time optimization in place (GCC only has it from 4.5). –  Alex B Jul 28 '10 at 6:52
2  
@Alex: Compilers are getting better and better at optimizing across translation units. (VC does it for several releases now.) –  sbi Jul 28 '10 at 6:59
6  
@Alex B: This is complete garbage. Many very common calling conventions make the caller responsible for allocating space for large return values and the callee responsible for their construction. RVO happily works across compilation units even without link time optimizations. –  Charles Bailey Jul 28 '10 at 7:03
3  
@Charles, upon checking it appears to be correct! I withdraw my clearly misinformed statement. –  Alex B Jul 28 '10 at 7:48

Did you try to use smart pointers (if Thing is really big and heavy object), like auto_ptr:


std::auto_ptr<Thing> calculateThing()
{
  std::auto_ptr<Thing> thing(new Thing);
  // .. some calculations
  return thing;
}


// ...
{
  std::auto_ptr<Thing> thing = calculateThing();
  // working with thing

  // auto_ptr frees thing 
}
share|improve this answer

Just create the object and return it

Thing calculateThing() {
    Thing thing;
    // do calculations and modify thing
     return thing;
}

I think you'll do yourself a favor if you forget about optimization and just write readable code (you'll need to run a profiler later - but don't pre-optimize).

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1  
Thing thing(); declares a local function and returning a Thing. –  dreamlax Jul 28 '10 at 6:42
1  
Thing thing() declares a function returning a thing. There is no Thing object constructed in your function body. –  Charles Bailey Jul 28 '10 at 6:42
2  
@dream @Charles: Hivemind? :) –  GManNickG Jul 28 '10 at 6:43
    
@dreamlax @Charles @GMan A little late, but fixed. –  Amir Rachum Mar 29 '11 at 7:55
    
Better late than never! Now I can upvote! –  dreamlax Mar 29 '11 at 8:01

One quick way to determine if a copy constructor is being called is to add logging to your class's copy constructor:

MyClass::MyClass(const MyClass &other)
{
    std::cout << "Copy constructor was called" << std::endl;
}

MyClass someFunction()
{
    MyClass dummy;
    return dummy;
}

Call someFunction; the number of "Copy constructor was called" lines that you will get will vary between 0, 1, and 2. If you get none, then your compiler has optimised the return value out (which it is allowed to do). If you get don't get 0, and your copy constructor is ridiculously expensive, then search for alternative ways to return instances from your functions.

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Just return a object like this:

Thing calculateThing() 
{
   Thing thing();
   // do calculations and modify thing
   return thing;
}

This will invoke the copy constructor on Things, so you might want to do your own implementation of that. Like this:

Thing(const Thing& aThing) {}

This might perform a little slower, but it might not be an issue at all.

Update

The compiler will probably optimize the call to the copy constructor, so there will bee no extra overhead. (Like dreamlax pointed out in the comment).

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2  
Thing thing(); declares a local function returning a Thing, also, the standard permits the compiler to omit the copy constructor in the case you presented; any modern compiler will probably do it. –  dreamlax Jul 28 '10 at 6:43
    
@dreamlax: Agreed –  Martin Ingvar Kofoed Jensen Jul 28 '10 at 6:52
    
You bring a good point by for implementing the copy constructor, especially if a deep copy is needed. –  mbadawi23 Jan 20 at 20:08

Firstly you have an error in the code, you mean to have Thing *thing(new Thing());, and only return thing;.

  • Use shared_ptr<Thing>. Deref it as tho it was a pointer. It will be deleted for you when the last reference to the Thing contained goes out of scope.
  • The first solution is very common in naive libraries. It has some performance, and syntactical overhead, avoid it if possible
  • Use the second solution only if you can guarantee no exceptions will be thrown, or when performance is absolutely critical (you will be interfacing with C or assembly before this even becomes relevant).
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thanks Matt, I've fix the syntax –  phunehehe Jul 28 '10 at 6:35

I'm sure a C++ expert will come along with a better answer, but personally I like the second approach. Using smart pointers helps with the problem of forgetting to delete and as you say, it looks cleaner than having to create an object before hand (and still having to delete it if you want to allocate it on the heap).

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