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I have a Java project that has both server and client packages. In addition I have a library package.

I use eclipse and have put everything in a single Java project, each section server,client and library are in separate packages, the problem is that when I export, everything gets added to the Jar file.

So I suppose I need two different projects, client and server, but what about the shared library files? What do I do about them? Do I actually need three different projects? It will become a little unwieldy as everything is actually related and I would like to keep them together.

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I use eclipse and have put everything in a single java project, each section server,client and library are in separate packages, the problem is that when I export, everything gets added to the Jar file.

This is the part that intrigued me, why are you exporting something that has both the client and the server? From a client-server perspective they are going to be distributed separately.

Do I actually need three different projects? It will become a little unwieldy as everything is actually related and I would like to keep them together.

Thanks to how IDEs can now manage dependencies across projects/modules, I don't think it looks as bad as you picture it. For example you can work simultaneously on the server code, and use its classes and interfaces from your client code, and reference JARs produced by the server project.

I'd like also to add that a 'Project' isn't the broadest encapsulation of code either, there is still a 'Workspace' that can contain a number of related 'Projects'. Other IDEs go for other wordings like 'Module' instead of 'Project'.

Closing thoughts:

For the least impedance path, I think you should separate the client and the server parts into two projects, and do the same think for the shared library in case you are compiling it from source i.e, not a 3rd party JAR.

So in the end of the day you will have 3 'products' from the compilation process and distribute them where they belong, with the 'library' duplicated on both distribution sides.

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You can have a separate project for your shared code, and create a library (i.e. jar file) for that. Then, your client and server projects can both use the shared library.

Even better, you can use this shared library for other projects in the future.

Note: Eclipse is just going to compile the source files into their respective class files and put then in the bin folder, or wherever you have your output folder set for the project properties. It doesn't create a jar file by default.

If you want to create jar files, the best way is to use a tool like ant. Then you would be able to create whatever jars you need, and structure it however you like.

Here's a link for reference: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1390598/create-multiple-jars-from-eclipse-project

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hi, I just updated the question a little to address this issue. Is there a way to organise the whole lot into a single related project but have the ability to export sections of the code to a jar? –  jax Jul 28 '10 at 12:10
    
If you want to build jar files, one way is to use a tool like ant. Refer to my latest edit. –  dcp Jul 28 '10 at 12:15
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You can create the separate project for client and server side, the shared package can be attach in the class path definition.

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... the problem is that when I export, everything gets added to the Jar file.

Is that really a problem? Maybe the shared code is an asset rather than a liability. Perhaps you should optimize the developer issues before worrying about the deployment problems that, around here, we've decided aren't problems after all.

So I suppose I need two different projects, client and server, but what about the shared library files? What do I do about them? Do I actually need three different projects? It will become a little unwieldy as everything is actually related and I would like to keep them together.

We have a similar situation here and chose to embrace the shared code. Everyone gets the same code and choses what mode and configuration they need to start up.

If you check out our large-ish system (a bit over 5000 classes), you get the code for the servers (two main flavors), the clients (another two types), shared content (third party jars, visual assets, etc.) and site specific material (configuration files, start-up scripts and example data).

The result is that, after one checkout, you have the complete package for all of our primary locations, build scripts and Netbeans and Eclipse launch configs. As a result, you can go from an empty machine (with just an IDE) to a working client-server combination in about five minutes.

As a result, double-click the server icon and you launch a server process, running the site-specific configuration. Double-click the client and you launch a client process that's ready to connect to the server you just made.

Punchline: don't make development and deployment harder on yourself unless there's a very good reason. In our case, it was simpler, cheaper and easier to maintain the situation where we gave every installation the exact same package.

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