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I'm writing an integration tests for my database, and I've got one question. At the beginning of a test method I'm adding some objects to database and at the end of the method I should remove it.

So I've got a code like:

var group = new ContactGroup { Name = UserLogin + "_test_group" };
group.ID = _provider.AddGroup(UserLogin, group);
Assert.That(_provider.GetGroup(UserLogin, group.ID), Is.Not.Null);
_provider.RemoveGroup(UserLogin, group.ID);

The point is that if assertion fails, RemoveGroup won't be executed. What can I do about it?

If i try this:

var group = new ContactGroup { Name = UserLogin + "_test_group" };
group.ID = _provider.AddGroup(UserLogin, group);
try
{
    Assert.That(_provider.GetGroup(UserLogin, group.ID), Is.Not.Null);
}
finally
{
    _provider.RemoveGroup(UserLogin, group.ID);
}

should I rethrow AssertionException like this

catch (AssertionException)
{
    throw;
}

?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

One way to handle cleanup in database integration tests is to execute the test in a transaction, which is then rolled back once the test has completed.

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Damn, it was so easy :) Thanks! –  HiveHicks Jul 28 '10 at 13:27

Use the a tear down method. The tear down method is executed right after every test.

   [TearDown]
    public void TearDown()
    {
       _provider.RemoveGroup(UserLogin, group.ID);
    }
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+1 There is also a tear-down for the class fixture, and another tear-down for the namespace. –  Adam Houldsworth Jul 28 '10 at 13:25
    
I create this group only in selected methods. Is there any other way to manage this, because I don't want to create group when I don't need it (before each test)? –  HiveHicks Jul 28 '10 at 13:26

The DBUnit people recomemend destorying on start up rather than shutdown (Good setup don't need cleanup!) and is what I do. So the start of the test removes any data the test does not expect.

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You don't need at catch clause at all. In C#, a try {... throw ...} finally {...} will execute the finally clause and then send the exception up the stack to the nearest catch, or out the top of the program if none. Thus

try {
    Assert.Fail("BOOM!");
} finally {
    Cleanup();
}

will do exactly what you want: run Cleanup() and then die from the assertion.

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