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I have a python script that invokes the following command:

# make

After make, it also invokes three other programs. Is there a standard way of telling whether the make command was succesful or not? Right now, if make is successful or unsuccessful, the program still continues to run. I want to raise an error that the make was not possible.

Can anyone give me direction with this? Thanks, friends.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The return value of the poll() and wait() methods is the return code of the process. Check to see if it's non-zero.

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Is poll() and wait() build into python or make? –  Carlo del Mundo Jul 28 '10 at 14:52
1  
poll and wait are methods understood by subprocess.Popen objects. Click the links in Ignacio's answer for more. –  unutbu Jul 28 '10 at 15:02
    
Thanks for the tip! Didn't even realize it was a link! –  Carlo del Mundo Jul 28 '10 at 15:05

Look at the exit code of make. If you are using the python module commands, then you can get the status code easily. 0 means success, non-zero means some problem.

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Thanks! I'll look into it –  Carlo del Mundo Jul 28 '10 at 14:52
import os
if os.system("make"):
    print "True"
else:
    print "False"
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Sorry. I don't think this works. I just tested it out with calling a dummy program that never exists and it never goes to the false statement –  Carlo del Mundo Jul 28 '10 at 15:51
    
This script will print True if make returned any errors, and false if it exited cleanly. –  Teodor Pripoae Jul 29 '10 at 12:16

Use subprocess.check_call(). That way you don't have to check the return code yourself - an Exception will be thrown if the return code was non-zero.

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