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I'm making a new web app using Rails, and was wondering, what's the difference between string and text? And when should each be used?

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3 Answers

up vote 171 down vote accepted

The difference relies in how the symbol is converted into its respective column type in query language.

with MySQL :string is mapped to VARCHAR(255) - http://guides.rubyonrails.org/migrations.html

:string |                   VARCHAR                | :limit => 1 to 255 (default = 255)  
:text   | TINYTEXT, TEXT, MEDIUMTEXT, or LONGTEXT2 | :limit => 1 to 4294967296 (default = 65536)2

http://www.packtpub.com/article/Working-with-Rails-ActiveRecord-Migrations-Models-Scaffolding-and-Database-Completion

When should each be used?

As a general rule of thumb, use :string for short text input (username, email, password, titles, etc.) and use :text for longer expected input such as descriptions, comment content, etc.

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I think a better rule of thumb is to always use :text. See depesz.com/2010/03/02/charx-vs-varcharx-vs-varchar-vs-text –  Reed G. Law Aug 31 '12 at 1:46
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For MySQL - not so much, you can have indexes on varchars, you cannot on text. –  Omar Qureshi Jan 24 '13 at 10:17
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PostgreSQL implementation prefers text. The only difference for pg string/text is constraint on length for string. No performance differences. –  wurde Mar 5 at 20:35
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If you are using postgres use text wherever you can, unless you have a size constraint since there is no performance penalty for text vs varchar

There is no performance difference among these three types, apart from increased storage space when using the blank-padded type, and a few extra CPU cycles to check the length when storing into a length-constrained column. While character(n) has performance advantages in some other database systems, there is no such advantage in PostgreSQL; in fact character(n) is usually the slowest of the three because of its additional storage costs. In most situations text or character varying should be used instead

PostsgreSQL manual

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muy interesante thanks for this tip 2 years later :) –  Steve Aug 9 '12 at 14:33
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But in the interest of being database agnostic, is this the best approach? What if you want to change the database? I grant, in the real world that doesn't happen that often, but still...if there's 'no peformance difference' why not stick to the expected use of string for short things and text for longer things? And given your own comment indexing strings, still seems the best approach. –  Dan Barron Apr 22 '13 at 14:35
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Who in their right mind would change their database from PostgreSQL to MySQL? –  Omar Qureshi Apr 23 '13 at 15:07
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There's any number of reasons why it might become necessary in the Real World, where it's best to shed the notion that there is One True Solution to any problem. –  Dan Barron Aug 23 '13 at 13:19
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That may be so, but database agnosticism is a false prophet. –  Omar Qureshi Aug 23 '13 at 22:00
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String translates to "Varchar" in your database, while text translates to "text". A varchar can contain far less items, a text can be of (almost) any length.

For an in-depth analysis with good references check http://www.pythian.com/news/7129/text-vs-varchar/

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