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Can I update two identical tables with one query?

TABLEA
_____________________________
|     id      |   value     |
|_____________|_____________| 
|      1      |      a      | 
|      2      |      b      | 
|      3      |      c      | 
|      4      |      d      | 
|      5      |      e      |    
|_____________|_____________| 

TABLEB
_____________________________
|     id      |   value     |
|_____________|_____________| 
|      1      |      a      | 
|      2      |      b      | 
|      3      |      c      | 
|      4      |      d      | 
|      5      |      e      |    
|_____________|_____________| 

I want to update both tables (SET value = 'z' WHERE id=3) at the same time. Is this possible?

-Thanks

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What DBMS are you using? –  Daniel Vassallo Jul 28 '10 at 15:31
1  
? The DB is MySQL and the language is PHP –  calumbrodie Jul 28 '10 at 15:37
    
Sorry, didn't notice the title. Added the mysql tag. –  Daniel Vassallo Jul 28 '10 at 15:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

MySQL supports multiple-table updates using the following syntax:

UPDATE tablea, tableb
SET    tablea.value = 'z', tableb.value = 'z'
WHERE  (tablea.id = tableb.id) AND (tablea.id = '3');

Test case:

CREATE TABLE tablea (id int, value char(1));
CREATE TABLE tableb (id int, value char(1));

INSERT INTO tablea VALUES (1, 'a');
INSERT INTO tablea VALUES (2, 'b');
INSERT INTO tablea VALUES (3, 'c');
INSERT INTO tablea VALUES (4, 'd');
INSERT INTO tablea VALUES (5, 'e');

INSERT INTO tableb VALUES (1, 'a');
INSERT INTO tableb VALUES (2, 'b');
INSERT INTO tableb VALUES (3, 'c');
INSERT INTO tableb VALUES (4, 'd');
INSERT INTO tableb VALUES (5, 'e');

Result:

SELECT * FROM tablea;
+------+-------+
| id   | value |
+------+-------+
|    1 | a     |
|    2 | b     |
|    3 | z     |
|    4 | d     |
|    5 | e     |
+------+-------+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

SELECT * FROM tableb;
+------+-------+
| id   | value |
+------+-------+
|    1 | a     |
|    2 | b     |
|    3 | z     |
|    4 | d     |
|    5 | e     |
+------+-------+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

UPDATE:

If you prefer not to repeat the value you are going to set twice, you may want to use the following trick:

UPDATE tablea, tableb, (SELECT 'z' val) d
SET    tablea.value = d.val, tableb.value = d.val
WHERE  (tablea.id = tableb.id) AND (tablea.id = '3');
share|improve this answer
    
Got there myself after your first answer - very simple - thanks for your quick response. –  calumbrodie Jul 28 '10 at 15:43
    
just noticed it wasn't you who provided that first answer - I've marked your anser as correct because you gave the first full solution @frabiacca Thanks for the link - I figured it out myself with the right line from the documentation. I don't find the MySQL docs the easiest to read (poor formatting) :-) –  calumbrodie Jul 28 '10 at 15:45
    
Yes, @frabiacca beat me by 44 seconds... I updated my answer with an alternative solution as a "thank you" for accepting my answer :) –  Daniel Vassallo Jul 28 '10 at 15:47

by reading mysql update reference, it says:

For the multiple-table syntax, UPDATE updates rows in each table named in table_references that satisfy the conditions. In this case, ORDER BY and LIMIT cannot be used.

UPDATE items,month SET items.price=month.price WHERE items.id=month.id;

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/update.html

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Thanks for this snippet from the docs - I couldn't find it for looking –  calumbrodie Jul 28 '10 at 15:46

It's possible to update them at the same time, but not with a single SQL statement (okay, it is, but it's not recommended). This is pretty much the whole point of transactions: you update each table individually, but those changes don't take effect until you commit. To any other user, the tables updated simultaneously.

If you're really insistent on updating both in one statement, the following might work, but it depends on both tables having ID as the primary key and may depend on the specific RDBMS you're using:

update (select tablea.id, 
               tablea.value v1, 
               tableb.value v2 
        from tablea 
             join tableb 
             on tablea.id = tableb.id)
set v1 = 'z'
where id = 3
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thanks for your answer - the solution was even simpler than the query provided. I stated MySQL in the title of the question :-) –  calumbrodie Jul 28 '10 at 15:41
    
@calumbrodie: I could have sworn I saw that somewhere, but when I went back to check, I didn't go all the way up to the title... –  Allan Jul 28 '10 at 15:53

Most RDBMS only allow you to insert, update or delete directly on one table at a time. If you have foreign keys and cascade then some inserts and deltes can go on more than one table

However if you are using a relational database you should not be having two tables that need the same update. One driver behing relational databases is data integrity that a relation is held in only one way.e/g/ in this case if id of 3 means that value is c (or z after a chnage) the relation should only be held in one place

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I'm aware of this - I didn't design the database :-) –  calumbrodie Jul 28 '10 at 15:40

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