Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

As per my understanding of RE

--> * means matches 0 or more occurrences of prev regex
--> + means matches 1 or more occurrences of prev regex

Now lets take a look at the following examples

FIRST:-

% regexp {:+} "DHCP:Enabled" first
1
% puts $first
:                     --> ":" is stored in variable first
%

SECOND:-

% regexp {:*} "DHCP:Enabled" sec
1
% puts $sec
                     --> Nothing is stored in variable second
%

Why is ":" stored for the FIRST one and not the SECOND?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

The second regexp {:*} matches the empty string because the empty string is 0 occurrences of :. If you use the -indices option for regexp, you'll see that it matches at position 0.

 % regexp -indices :* "DHCP:Enabled" indices
 1
 % puts $indices
 0 -1

In other words, the regexp matches at the first character and returns.

share|improve this answer

It matches the empty string so that it can match that empty string at the start of “DHCP:Enabled”. The regular expression engine like to match things up as soon as possible. To show, here's an interactive session:

% regexp -inline {:*} "DHCP:Enabled"
{}
% regexp -inline -all {:*} "DHCP:Enabled"
{} {} {} {} : {} {} {} {} {} {} {}
% regexp -inline -indices -all {:*} "DHCP:Enabled"
{0 -1} {1 0} {2 1} {3 2} {4 4} {5 4} {6 5} {7 6} {8 7} {9 8} {10 9} {11 10}

The -inline option is useful for simple testing, the -all matches in every matchable location instead of just the first, and the -indices returns locations rather than the string.

Note that only once (4 4) is the end at least at the same index as the start; in all other cases, an empty string matches (and it's legal; you said that matching nothing was OK).

In general, it's a really good idea to make sure that your overall RE cannot match the empty string or you'll be surprised by the results.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.