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I am trying to figure out a way to read a CSV with returns in it in PHP. The problem is when you read the file like this:

if (($handle = fopen($file, "r")) !== FALSE) {
 while (($data = fgetcsv($handle, 1000, ",")) !== FALSE) {
        row data...
    }
}

If you have a retun in the CSV it does not work, it just sees the returns as a new row.

My idea was to have a regex to check for unclosed quotes, but I dont know of anything like that. Any ideas?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since it seems the built-in fgetcsv does not correctly handle the CSV standard, there are suggestions for alternatives on the PHP man page for fgetcsv - here's one of them:

From http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.fgetcsv.php

The PHP's CSV handling stuff is non-standard and contradicts with RFC4180, thus fgetcsv() cannot properly deal with files like this example ...

There is a quick and dirty RFC-compliant realization of CSV creation and parsing:

<?php 
function array_to_csvstring($items, $CSV_SEPARATOR = ';', $CSV_ENCLOSURE = '"', $CSV_LINEBREAK = "\n") { 
  $string = ''; 
  $o = array(); 

  foreach ($items as $item) { 
    if (stripos($item, $CSV_ENCLOSURE) !== false) { 
      $item = str_replace($CSV_ENCLOSURE, $CSV_ENCLOSURE . $CSV_ENCLOSURE, $item); 
    } 

    if ((stripos($item, $CSV_SEPARATOR) !== false) 
     || (stripos($item, $CSV_ENCLOSURE) !== false) 
     || (stripos($item, $CSV_LINEBREAK !== false))) { 
      $item = $CSV_ENCLOSURE . $item . $CSV_ENCLOSURE; 
    } 

    $o[] = $item; 
  } 

  $string = implode($CSV_SEPARATOR, $o) . $CSV_LINEBREAK; 

  return $string; 
} 

function csvstring_to_array(&$string, $CSV_SEPARATOR = ';', $CSV_ENCLOSURE = '"', $CSV_LINEBREAK = "\n") { 
  $o = array(); 

  $cnt = strlen($string); 
  $esc = false; 
  $escesc = false; 
  $num = 0; 
  $i = 0; 
  while ($i < $cnt) { 
    $s = $string[$i]; 

    if ($s == $CSV_LINEBREAK) { 
      if ($esc) { 
        $o[$num] .= $s; 
      } else { 
        $i++; 
        break; 
      } 
    } elseif ($s == $CSV_SEPARATOR) { 
      if ($esc) { 
        $o[$num] .= $s; 
      } else { 
        $num++; 
        $esc = false; 
        $escesc = false; 
      } 
    } elseif ($s == $CSV_ENCLOSURE) { 
      if ($escesc) { 
        $o[$num] .= $CSV_ENCLOSURE; 
        $escesc = false; 
      } 

      if ($esc) { 
        $esc = false; 
        $escesc = true; 
      } else { 
        $esc = true; 
        $escesc = false; 
      } 
    } else { 
      if ($escesc) { 
        $o[$num] .= $CSV_ENCLOSURE; 
        $escesc = false; 
      } 

      $o[$num] .= $s; 
    } 

    $i++; 
  } 

//  $string = substr($string, $i); 

  return $o; 
} 
?> 
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The question is will a server be able to handle 50,000 rows? The server I am making this for will need to be able to handle that. Thanks for the quick response! –  Nitroware Jul 28 '10 at 16:58
    
Well, that will depend on the server specs and what else it might be doing and so on. The code itself seems simple enough that it shouldn't have any issues - but I'm certainly not even close to a PHP performance expert, so don't take that as a guarantee. –  Peter Boughton Jul 28 '10 at 17:02
    
@Nitroware 50k rows is not a problem. You'll need to set high enough memory_limit. The CSV will consume many times more memory when serialized to array than what it did as a flat file. Start with 64M. –  jmz Jul 28 '10 at 17:11

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