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Let's say I have this line somewhere in my code:

<ul id="mobileBtnsBot">
            <li>
                <a href="/m/alert/index.shtml"><span class="alertsBtn"></span><span class="btnText">Alerts & Advisories</span></a><div class="button_last"></div>
            </li>
            <li>
                <a href="/m/alert/index.shtml"><span class="schedBtn"></span><span class="btnText">Schedules</span></a><div class="button_last"></div>
            </li>
            <li>
                <a href="/m/alert/index.shtml"><span class="mapsBtn"></span><span class="btnText">Maps & Stations</span></a><div class="button_last"></div>
            </li>
            <li>
                <a href="/m/alert/index.shtml"><span class="trainBtn"></span><span class="btnText">TrainView</span></a><div class="button_last"></div>
            </li>
            <li>
                <a href="/m/alert/index.shtml"><span class="ntaBtn"></span><span class="btnText">Next To Arrive</span></a><div class="button_last"></div>
            </li>
            <li>
                <a href="/m/alert/index.shtml"><span class="faresBtn"></span><span class="btnText">Fares</span></a><div class="button_last"></div>
            </li>
            <li>
                <a href="/m/alert/index.shtml"><span class="mediaBtn"></span><span class="btnText">@ SEPTA</span></a><div class="button_last"></div>
            </li>
            <li>
                <a href="/m/alert/index.shtml"><span class="button_beg"></span><span class="btnText">Find my Location</span></a><div class="button_last"></div>
            </li>
        </ul>

I want to use JavaScript to find the <a> holding the text Find my location and hide it according to whichever user-agent your on.

I know you are not supposed to use user-agents as such but I can't use any server-side languages.

If anyone knows how to accomplish this or has a better idea, please share.

EDIT: This page is being created from a web form in Alfresco CMS. If I give it an ID they all get the ID.

isBrowser.js

if (navigator.userAgent.indexOf('Gecko')!= -1
         || navigator.userAgent.indexOf('MSIE')!= -1 || navigator.userAgent.indexOf('Opera')!= -1 || navigator.userAgent.indexOf('Chrome')!= -1) {
    document.write('<link rel="stylesheet" href="/m/css/smartmobile.css" type="text/css" />');
}
else if (navigator.userAgent.indexOf('webkit')!= -1) {
    document.write('<link rel="stylesheet" href="/m/css/smartmobile.css" type="text/css" />');
}
else{
  alert("load mobile css");
  document.write('<link rel="stylesheet" href="/m/css/mobile.css" type="text/css" />');
    function hideListItem(text)
    {
        var ul = document.getElementById("mobileBtnsBot");
        alert("line1");
        for(var i = 0; i < ul.childNodes.length; i++)
        {
          alert("line2-loop");
            var li = ul.childNodes[i];
    alert("line3-loop");
            // Element node.
            if (li.nodeType == 1)
            {
              alert("line4-loop");
                // Find the text in all of the inner-html.
                if (li.innerHTML.indexOf(text) != -1)
                {
                  alert("line5-loop");
                    li.style.display = "none";
                    break;
                }
                alert("line6-loop");
            }
            alert("line7-loop");
        }
        alert("line8");
    }
     hideListItem("Find my Location");
}

mobile-script.js

window.onload = function () {
setTimeout(function(){window.scrollTo(0, 1);}, 100);
var linkElementLnk = document.getElementById("BackButtonlnk");
linkElementLnk.style.display = 'none';
insert();
}

function insert(){
var linkElement = document.getElementById("BackButton");
var linkElementLnk = document.getElementById("BackButtonlnk");
var loc_array = document.location.href.split('/');

if (loc_array[loc_array.length-3] == "maps"|| loc_array[loc_array.length-2] == "stations" || loc_array[loc_array.length-3] == "stations" )
{
  linkElementLnk.style.display = 'block';
  var newT = document.createTextNode("Stations & Maps");
}
else if (loc_array[loc_array.length-3] == "m")
{
  linkElementLnk.style.display = 'none';
}
else if (loc_array[loc_array.length-3] != "m")
{
    linkElementLnk.style.display = 'block';

     if (loc_array[loc_array.length-2] == "w" || loc_array[loc_array.length-2] == "s" || loc_array[loc_array.length-2] == "h" )
     {
        var newT = document.createTextNode(unescape(capWords(loc_array[loc_array.length-2])));
     }

     else
     {
          if (loc_array[loc_array.length-1] == "index.html" || loc_array[loc_array.length-1] == "index.shtml" || loc_array[loc_array.length-1] == "")
          {
          var newT = document.createTextNode(unescape(capWords(loc_array[loc_array.length-3])));
          }
          else
          {
          var newT = document.createTextNode(unescape(capWords(loc_array[loc_array.length-2])));
          }
     }
}
linkElement.appendChild(newT);
}
function capWords(str){ 
   var words = str.split(" "); 
   for (var i=0 ; i < words.length ; i++){ 
      var testwd = words[i]; 
      var firLet = testwd.substr(0,1); 
      var rest = testwd.substr(1, testwd.length -1) 
      words[i] = firLet.toUpperCase() + rest 
   }
   return words;
} 
share|improve this question
    
Can't you assign some id to this <a> element? – ŁukaszW.pl Jul 28 '10 at 17:37
1  
Determining browser has nothing to do with server side technology. You should use object detection to determine the browser. – TheCloudlessSky Jul 28 '10 at 17:38
    
super easy with a jQuery selector but you might not have that option – hunter Jul 28 '10 at 17:38
1  
Why can't you give each one an Id? If it's in a list, you need to provide more details for what's containing this <a>. – TheCloudlessSky Jul 28 '10 at 17:41
1  
This is just a suggestion, but if you're having to write HTML just to style it properly such as <div class="button_last"> and empty elements such as <span class="mapsBtn"></span>, then you are not using CSS properly. Ideally, you should just have a ul with a bunch of li's in it, and each li contains a link. Apply whatever content specific classes there are to either this li or the anchor inside. – Anurag Jul 28 '10 at 20:04
up vote 1 down vote accepted

EDIT:

$("#mobileBtns > li:has(span:contains(TrainView))").hide();

Change TrainView to whatever text you want to search for. This selects the li element under mobileBtns that has a span that contains the text TrainView. If you want a non-jquery solution let me know.

function isBrowser(browserName)
{
  var userAgent = navigator.userAgent;

  for(var i = 0; i < browserName.length; i++)
  {
      if(userAgent.indexOf(browserName[i]) != -1)
      {
          return true;
      }
  }

  return false;
}

if(isBrowser(["BlackBerry"]))
{
   document.write('<link rel="stylesheet" href="/m/css/mobile.css" type="text/css" />');
}
else if(isBrowser(["iPhone", "Android", "Gecko", "MSIE", "Chrome", "Opera"]))
{
  document.write('<link rel="stylesheet" href="/m/css/smartmobile.css" type="text/css" />');
}
else
{
  document.write('<link rel="stylesheet" href="/m/css/mobile.css" type="text/css" />');
}

EDIT: You need to wrap the $(...) code after the document has loaded like this:

$(document).ready(function ()
{
    $("#mobileBtns > li:has(span:contains(TrainView))").hide();
});

EDIT 2: Here's a javascript funciton that doesn't use jQuery to find/hide the list item. Replace the $(document).read()... with this code:

function hideListItem(text)
{
    var ul = document.getElementById("mobileBtns");

    for(var i = 0; i < ul.childNodes.length; i++)
    {
        var li = ul.childNodes[i];

        // Element node.
        if (li.nodeType == 1)
        {
            // Find the text in all of the inner-html.
            if (li.innerHTML.indexOf(text) != -1)
            {
                li.style.display = "none";
                break;
            }
        }
    }

}

window.onload = function (e)
{
    hideListItem("Schedules");
};

EDIT 3: Ok I think window.onload isn't supported in your version of the browser. What you can do is move the JavaScript call to hideListItem() code to the end of the body tag:

<html>
<head>
<!-- put your hideListItem function declaration here -->
</head>
<body>

<!--...stuff here...-->

<script type="text/javascript">
hideListItem("Schedules");
</script>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
I'm going to try it out first. I like jQuery much more – balexander Jul 28 '10 at 17:57
    
Can the down-voter give a reason? This solution works great and isn't subject to random performance issues. – TheCloudlessSky Jul 28 '10 at 17:57
    
I like this one best but with the cleaner HTML i produced would it still work? – balexander Jul 28 '10 at 20:05
    
@Bry4n - I've edited my response with your edit request. – TheCloudlessSky Jul 28 '10 at 20:09
    
Thanks I'll try this and respond back, at the latest tomorrow then eventually pick one of these answers as the ultimate solution. Will that fit within the JavaScript? Or should I come up with a different user-agent solution – balexander Jul 28 '10 at 20:29

Here's a nice short one.

function findLink (text) {
  var i=-1, v, r=[];
  while (v=document.links[++i]) if ((''+v.innerHTML).match(text)) r.push(v);
  return r;
}

It will turn an array of all <a> elements containing text. text can be a plain string or a regular expression.


Here's a version with an optional callback function. It will be called on all matching links. The first (and only) argument to the function is the <a> element. You can return false from your callback to stop finding links.

function findLink (text, callback) {
  var i=-1, v, r=[], cb=callback||new Function;
  while (v=document.links[++i]) if ((''+v.innerHTML).match(text)) {
    r.push(v); 
    if (cb(v)===false) return r;
  }
  return r;
}

So, hiding the link according to the useragent sounds like a bad idea, but if you're dead set on it, you could do something like this (if I read your question right):

if ((''+navigator.userAgent).match(/BlackBerry|Android|iPhone/)) {
  document.body.innerHTML+='<link rel="stylesheet" href="/m/css/mobile.css" type="text/css" />';
  findLink('Find my Location', function (link) { 
    link.style.display='none'; 
    return false;
  });
}
share|improve this answer
1  
how do you figure? I thought it was pretty straightforward. – Dagg Nabbit Jul 28 '10 at 18:17
1  
@no Are you an old school C programmer in hiding? (regarding the long lines that do a lot of stuff) – Peter Ajtai Jul 28 '10 at 18:31
2  
I was able to follow it just fine. As far as obfuscation goes, this is not it. – jason Jul 28 '10 at 18:32
1  
Using the Function constructor? Ehh... ;P I also don't like your style of iteration, because most JS out there doesn't do it this way. I like your way of solving the problem, though. – strager Jul 28 '10 at 19:00
1  
@strager: new Function could go, might be less (micro)optimal than function(){} but to me it's more readable. I like the var i=-1,v;while(v=o[++i]) style of iteration bc it's like a foreach; it gives a value v so you don't have to do o[i] inside your loop. "Most js" is not a representation of good js. Not that this is especially good, just that most is especially bad. – Dagg Nabbit Jul 28 '10 at 19:17

Fairly simple, though not exactly efficient. This function will hide any anchor that has p_text inside it. Simply call hide('Find my Location') to accomplish what you want.

var hide = function(p_text, p_elem)
{
    var elem = (p_elem) ? p_elem : document,
        anchors = elem.getElementsByTagName('a'), i = 0;

    for (i = 0; i < anchors.length; i++)
    {
        if (anchors[i].innerHTML.indexOf(p_text) >= 0)
        {
            anchors[i].style.display = 'none';
        }
    }
}

As for the user-agent, feature detection is the way to go, but if you're not browser-detecting to use different features, you may have to actually sniff the UA. Feature detection is great. It really is. When you're using the features you're detecting. But user-agent sniffing has its place, and this may be one of those cases.

[waits for the flame]

Edit: Added optional "p_elem" argument. If you have a container element, you can search that element only by calling hide('Find my Location', containerElement) where containerElement is a DOM node.

share|improve this answer
    
Was just about to submit something very similar. – cmptrgeekken Jul 28 '10 at 17:50
    
-1 because you should be iterating over all the anchor tags! – TheCloudlessSky Jul 28 '10 at 17:52
    
@TheCloudlessSky - Explain, please? I'm pretty sure I am iterating over all the anchor tags. – Ryan Kinal Jul 28 '10 at 17:56
    
It's basically being used to show different styles based on the type of mobile phone. – balexander Jul 28 '10 at 17:56
2  
@Ryan - True but anchor tags are common element, I really think it's overkill. If the OP provided a container for the <a>'s then they could easily use someContainer.getElementsByTagName('a');. – TheCloudlessSky Jul 28 '10 at 18:11

Why are you using user agents instead of just feature detection?

I presume you are looking for geolocation capabilities on the client, so why not simply check that:

function isGeolocationSupported() {
    return !!navigator.geolocation;
}

See the GeoLocation API spec and a HTML5 site with more examples.

Also, I wouldn't add jQuery for this very feature as even 24K is a lot for mobile devices. You can use the Selectors API to query the text inside the span elements using:

var links = document.querySelectorAll("a.main");

for(var i = 0; i <links.length; i++) {
    var link = links[i];
    var span = link.querySelector('span');
    var text = span.firstChild.nodeValue;
    if(text == 'Find my Location') {
        link.style.visibility = 'hidden';
    }
}

Here's the same without the Selectors API.

var canQueryByClass = 'getElementsByClassName' in document;
var canQueryByTag = 'getElementsByTagName' in document;

if(!(canQueryByClass && canQueryByTag)) {
    // hopeless client, no need to check further.
}

var links = document.getElementsByClassName("main");

for(var i = 0; i <links.length; i++) {
    var link = links[i];
    var span = link.getElementsByTagName('span');
    if(span.length) {
        var text = span.firstChild.nodeValue;
        if(text == 'Find my Location') {
            link.style.visibility = 'hidden';
        }
    }
}

See a working example. ​

share|improve this answer
2  
Using querySelectorAll with throw an exception on browsers that don't support it. This is a strictly HTML5 solution... – TheCloudlessSky Jul 28 '10 at 18:07
    
The geolocation part - yes. The querySelector part - no. The Selectors API is easily replaceable with getElementsByClassName and getElementsByTagName. Also, if a browser does not support the Selectors API, its very likely that it doesn't have geolocation support either. Object detection for querySelector(All) support before actually calling it is trivial, if(document.querySelector) ... – Anurag Jul 28 '10 at 18:14
    
getElementsByClassName isn't supported in IE8 and below. See quirksmode.org/dom/w3c_core.html#t11 – TheCloudlessSky Jul 28 '10 at 18:31
    
@TheCloudlessSky, It's probably only executing on the BlackBerry anyway. – strager Jul 28 '10 at 19:08
    
@strager - Could be true, but it will still throw an exception if it's not supported. – TheCloudlessSky Jul 28 '10 at 19:45

Without assingning extra id you can make it like that:

 var spans = document.getElementsByTagName('span');
 for(i = 0; i < spans.length; i++)
    if(spans[i].innerText == 'Find my location')
    {
     var aElement = spans[i];
        while(aElement.tagName != 'a')
      aElement = aElement.parentElement;

     aElement.style.display = 'none';
    }

This is pure JS solution, search for the span with the text, then follow up until finds the link element and hides it.

share|improve this answer
    
Performance-wise, this is terrible. What if there are a lot of spans on the page that have nothing to do with "Find my location". – TheCloudlessSky Jul 28 '10 at 17:50
1  
Ryan Kinal solution has the same problem. What if thre are many links on the page? And what do you think selectors does? It also goes throught many of spans and compares it content... – ŁukaszW.pl Jul 28 '10 at 17:53
    
And the minus for what? – ŁukaszW.pl Jul 28 '10 at 17:54
1  
You also have the possibility to hit an exception. If a span has 'Find my location' and ISN'T wrapped in an <a>. – TheCloudlessSky Jul 28 '10 at 17:56
1  
+1 - Without knowing absolutely anything else about the element, the only solution is to go through each element and search. – Anurag Jul 28 '10 at 18:05

As for getting at the <a>, you can do this easily with jQuery:

$(".main").hide();

But you have another problem: You cannot access the user-agent from JavaScript. You will have to resort to a server-side script - and since your question mentions that you can't, you're out of luck for hiding the <a>.


Edit: give the <a> a unique ID, like:

<a id='user_agent_thing' ...

Then you can use:

$("#user_agent_thing").hide();

Further edit: you can find the specific element by its text this way:

var span_element = $('span').filter(function() { return $(this).text() == 'Find my Location'; });

Then you can hide the whole thing by doing:

span_element.parent().parent().parent().hide();
share|improve this answer
    
There are multiple elements using that class. – balexander Jul 28 '10 at 17:39
    
.main is a class, so there can be more than one. This would hide all instance of .main, not necessarily what you want. – Peter Ajtai Jul 28 '10 at 17:41
    
@Bry4n, @Peter: See my edit. – Nathan Osman Jul 28 '10 at 17:41
    
@Hristo: Please see the edit. – Nathan Osman Jul 28 '10 at 17:42
    
I can not give a unique ID – balexander Jul 28 '10 at 17:44

For the new HTML:

$('#mobileBtns li:contains(Find my Location)').hide();

For the old HTML:

This jQuery snippet should do the trick (test):

$('.main:has(.button_bg > span:contains(Find my Location))').hide();

To do what you probably want, which is guarded against i18n (test):

$('a.main[href$=media/findmy​​​​​​​​]').hide();

The last example shows that you can perform the hiding using CSS3:

a.main[href$=media/findmy] {
    display: none;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can someone please explain why I got a downvote? See the test page; it does work, unless I misunderstood the question. – strager Jul 28 '10 at 18:10
1  
I didn't down vote, but probably cause the OP asked for a Javascript soludion and you gave an $('.I').('.can:has(jQueries)').delay(NONE!!!) solution. Seems to be a growing pet peeve of some. – Peter Ajtai Jul 28 '10 at 18:33
1  
@Peter - It is a valid response if the OP has jQuery. For others searching this may be their solution if they're already using jQuery. – TheCloudlessSky Jul 28 '10 at 18:46
    
This is a valid answer, as the OP did not specify. In comments, the OP did mention jQuery could be used, so a jQuery solution would be acceptable. A vanilla solution may work better, but an optimized and cross-platform one would be very verbose. (That's mostly the point of frameworks in JS.) – strager Jul 28 '10 at 18:56
    
@TheCloudlessSky - I'm just taking a guess at the reason. I think the solution's fine personally. – Peter Ajtai Jul 28 '10 at 19:03

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