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We have a very unsual problem. We have an aspx page that loads in Firefox inside 3 seconds. In IE8 it takes 20 seconds. This is consistent across a number of PCs. We have changed the page so that the only thing output is HTML and images - there is no javascript (the page as designed uses a lot of jquery for accordion style behviour and we speculated this might be the problem so we stripped it all out and get exactly the same thing happening).

Neither Firebug nor httpwatch are pointing to what the problem is. The page payload is around 470K.

I am truly baffled. Any help, insights or pointers would be very much appreciated

All the Best

Tony

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Question: why is IE slow. Answer: IE sucks. –  Adam Crossland Jul 28 '10 at 17:49
    
useful answer, very helpful and insightful –  tony.wiredin Jul 29 '10 at 7:39

2 Answers 2

Are you using any controls that might create jquery or javasript at compile-time?

Note: pretty much anything that uses the ajax library components do this.

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No ajax at all - we tend to prefer to roll our own with jquery as it doesn't bloat the page so much –  tony.wiredin Jul 29 '10 at 7:38
    
What sort of activities are going on in the page? Gridviews, dependant dropdowns, codebehind? –  C Bauer Jul 29 '10 at 12:10
    
It's a bunch of repeaters rendering html. No dependent drop downs. The page is built within Kentico CMS and uses their API to grab data from database BUT we store the query output in session and load from that when returning to the page. We see the difference between IE and FF either on initial page load (i.e. when there is nothing in session) or when returning to the page (when it's cached in session) It's really baffling –  tony.wiredin Jul 29 '10 at 12:33
    
Are the repeaters nested? –  C Bauer Jul 29 '10 at 13:52
    
Yes - to two levels i.e. one set has one level of nesting, if that makes sense –  tony.wiredin Jul 30 '10 at 6:10

This appears to be another solution to the IE large file load delay: create a smaller HTML file which links via HREF to the large file (or to a bookmark (named anchor) in that file).

This test has been tried multiple times with the IE direct load of the large file always causing a long delay, but not when the user clicks the link in the small file to go to the large file.

Perhaps, IE is analyzing the primary file to see if it had already been loaded into the cache.

Note: This HTML file being tested is 11 MB (text from a 2000-page book with many bookmarks and links to those bookmarks from other parts of this very long HTML page). Tests were performed with Firefox 15.0.1 and IE 8.0.6001.

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