Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I get my own program's name at runtime? What's Go's equivalent of C/C++'s argv[0]? To me it is useful to generate the usage with the right name.

Update: added some code.

package main

import (
    "flag"
    "fmt"
    "os"
)

func usage() {
    fmt.Fprintf(os.Stderr, "usage: myprog [inputfile]\n")
    flag.PrintDefaults()
    os.Exit(2)
}

func main() {
    flag.Usage = usage
    flag.Parse()

    args := flag.Args()
    if len(args) < 1 {
        fmt.Println("Input file is missing.");
        os.Exit(1);
    }
    fmt.Printf("opening %s\n", args[0]);
    // ...
}
share|improve this question
1  
Instead of detecting the length of flag.Args() here you could use flag.NArg() –  Keith Smiley Aug 23 '13 at 20:24
    
The right answer is os.Args[], not flag.Args(). The flag package is for parsing command line arguments like -this -that, and flag.Args() returns the remaining arguments that aren't parsed. Here's an example: play.golang.org/p/_YtTcqLWnl –  fiorix May 29 at 1:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 60 down vote accepted

import "os"
os.Args[0] // name of the command that it is running as os.Args[1] // first command line parameter, ...

Arguments are exposed in the os package http://golang.org/pkg/os/#Variables

If you're going to do argument handling, the flag package http://golang.org/pkg/flag is the preferred way. Specifically for your case flag.Usage

Update for the example you gave:

func usage() {
    fmt.Fprintf(os.Stderr, "usage: %s [inputfile]\n", os.Args[0])
    flag.PrintDefaults()
    os.Exit(2)
}

should do the trick

share|improve this answer
    
I couldn't figure out how to get it in flag and didn't know os has that information. Thanks. –  grokus Jul 28 '10 at 18:24
    
warning - do not use this technique if you are invoking a program via "go run", you will get the autogenerated a.out. –  brad clawsie Mar 3 '13 at 23:11
4  
@bradclawsie you get a.out because that's the name of the executable, the behavior is still correct. –  cthom06 Mar 4 '13 at 0:51

use os.Args[0] from the os package

package main
import "os"
func main() {
    println("I am ", os.Args[0])
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.