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The typical ConfigParser generated file looks like:

[Section]
bar=foo
[Section 2]
bar2= baz

Now, is there a way to index lists like, for instance:

[Section 3]
barList={
    item1,
    item2
}

Related question: Python’s ConfigParser unique keys per section

? Thanks in advance

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9 Answers 9

up vote 42 down vote accepted

There is nothing stopping you from packing the list into a delimited string and then unpacking it once you get the string from the config. If you did it this way your config section would look like:

[Section 3]
barList=item1,item2

It's not pretty but it's functional for most simple lists.

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4  
That's the way the Python logging config file works. –  S.Lott Dec 3 '08 at 0:02
1  
And if you've got complex lists, you can refer to this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/330900/… :-) –  John Fouhy Dec 3 '08 at 1:06
    
nice solution, but how to do it if there is no possible delimiter than you can guarantee will not appear inside a list item??? –  wim Feb 27 '12 at 23:23
    
@wim See my answer, you can use \n as delimiter –  Peter Smit Aug 8 '12 at 14:27

Also a bit late, but maybe helpful for some. I am using a combination of ConfigParser and JSON:

[Foo]
fibs: [1,1,2,3,5,8,13]

just read it with:

>>> json.loads(config.get("Foo","fibs"))
[1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13]

Of course i could just use JSON, but i find config files much more readable, and the [DEFAULT] Section very handy.

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2  
+1 for running json.loads on this –  bmu Jun 26 '12 at 7:40
    
Better format: ["a", "b", "c"] –  Chien-Wei Huang Sep 13 '13 at 16:47
1  
It's awesome because it does automatically "cast" values which can be useful if you don't know the types beforehand. –  LeGBT Oct 26 at 21:26

Coming late to this party, but I recently implemented this with a dedicated section in a config file for a list:

[paths]
path1           = /some/path/
path2           = /another/path/
...

and using config.items( "paths" ) to get an iterable list of path items, like so:

path_items = config.items( "paths" )
for key, path in path_items:
    #do something with path

Hope this helps other folk Googling this question ;)

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2  
I like this solution, because you can ; comment out certain items from the list without having to rewrite the whole list. –  wim Feb 27 '12 at 23:24
1  
+1, but if you do this, just be careful with also using key, as ConfigParser converts all such keys to lower-case –  Alex Dean May 1 '12 at 18:49
3  
@AlexDean You can setup the ConfigParser to leave the camelCase in place by setting optionxform = str. Example: config = ConfigParser.SafeConfigParser() config.optionxform = str Then the case will be left alone –  Cameron Goodale Sep 13 '12 at 21:06
    
Thanks @CameronGoodale, good to know! –  Alex Dean Sep 13 '12 at 21:16

One thing a lot of people don't know is that multi-line configuration-values are allowed. For example:

;test.ini
[hello]
barlist = 
    item1
    item2

The value of config.get('hello','barlist') will now be:

"\nitem1\nitem2"

Which you easily can split with the splitlines method (don't forget to filter empty items).

If we look to a big framework like Pyramid they are using this technique:

def aslist_cronly(value):
    if isinstance(value, string_types):
        value = filter(None, [x.strip() for x in value.splitlines()])
    return list(value)

def aslist(value, flatten=True):
    """ Return a list of strings, separating the input based on newlines
    and, if flatten=True (the default), also split on spaces within
    each line."""
    values = aslist_cronly(value)
    if not flatten:
        return values
    result = []
    for value in values:
        subvalues = value.split()
        result.extend(subvalues)
    return result

Source

Myself, I would maybe extend the ConfigParser if this is a common thing for you:

class MyConfigParser(ConfigParser):
    def getlist(self,section,option):
        value = self.get(section,option)
        return list(filter(None, (x.strip() for x in value.splitlines())))

    def getlistint(self,section,option):
        return [int(x) for x in self.getlist(section,option)]

Note that there are a few things to look out for when using this technique

  1. New lines that are items should start with whitespace (e.g. a space or a tab)
  2. All following lines that start with whitespace are considered to be part of the previous item. Also if it has an = sign or if it starts with a ; following the whitespace.
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Only primitive types are supported for serialization by config parser. I would use JSON or YAML for that kind of requirement.

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thanks for the clarification, utku. the only problem is that i can't use external packages at the moment. i think i'm gonna write a simple class to handle this. i'll share it eventually. –  pistacchio Dec 2 '08 at 22:44
    
What version of Python are you running? The JSON module is included with 2.6. –  Patrick Harrington Dec 3 '08 at 0:11

I faced the same problem in the past. If you need more complex lists, consider creating your own parser by inheriting from ConfigParser. Then you would overwrite the get method with that:

    def get(self, section, option):
    """ Get a parameter
    if the returning value is a list, convert string value to a python list"""
    value = SafeConfigParser.get(self, section, option)
    if (value[0] == "[") and (value[-1] == "]"):
        return eval(value)
    else:
        return value

With this solution you will also be able to define dictionaries in your config file.

But be careful! This is not as safe: this means anyone could run code through your config file. If security is not an issue in your project, I would consider using directly python classes as config files. The following is much more powerful and expendable than a ConfigParser file:

class Section
    bar = foo
class Section2
    bar2 = baz
class Section3
    barList=[ item1, item2 ]
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I was thinking of doing this, however: why not have the config values set up like barList=item1,item2 and then call if value.find(',') > 0: return value.split(','), or better yet, have the application parse all config options as lists, and just .split(',') everything blindly? –  Droogans Oct 31 '12 at 16:53

If you want to literally pass in a list then you can use:

ast.literal_eval()

For example configuration:

[section]
option=["item1","item2","item3"]

The code is:

import ConfigParser
import ast

my_list = ast.literal_eval(config.get("section", "option"))
print(type(my_list))
print(my_list)

output:

<type'list'>
["item1","item2","item3"]
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import ConfigParser
import os

class Parser(object):
    """attributes may need additional manipulation"""
    def __init__(self, section):
        """section to retun all options on, formatted as an object
        transforms all comma-delimited options to lists
        comma-delimited lists with colons are transformed to dicts
        dicts will have values expressed as lists, no matter the length
        """
        c = ConfigParser.RawConfigParser()
        c.read(os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), 'config.cfg'))

        self.section_name = section

        self.__dict__.update({k:v for k, v in c.items(section)})

        #transform all ',' into lists, all ':' into dicts
        for key, value in self.__dict__.items():
            if value.find(':') > 0:
                #dict
                vals = value.split(',')
                dicts = [{k:v} for k, v in [d.split(':') for d in vals]]
                merged = {}
                for d in dicts:
                    for k, v in d.items():
                        merged.setdefault(k, []).append(v)
                self.__dict__[key] = merged
            elif value.find(',') > 0:
                #list
                self.__dict__[key] = value.split(',')

So now my config.cfg file, which could look like this:

[server]
credentials=username:admin,password:$3<r3t
loggingdirs=/tmp/logs,~/logs,/var/lib/www/logs
timeoutwait=15

Can be parsed into fine-grained-enough objects for my small project.

>>> import config
>>> my_server = config.Parser('server')
>>> my_server.credentials
{'username': ['admin'], 'password', ['$3<r3t']}
>>> my_server.loggingdirs:
['/tmp/logs', '~/logs', '/var/lib/www/logs']
>>> my_server.timeoutwait
'15'

This is for very quick parsing of simple configs, you lose all ability to fetch ints, bools, and other types of output without either transforming the object returned from Parser, or re-doing the parsing job accomplished by the Parser class elsewhere.

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I landed here seeking to consume this...

[global]
spys = richard.sorge@cccp.gov, mata.hari@deutschland.gov

The answer is to split it on the comma and strip the spaces:

SPYS = [e.strip() for e in parser.get('global', 'spys').split(',')]

To get a list result:

['richard.sorge@cccp.gov', 'mata.hari@deutschland.gov']

It may not answer the OP's question exactly but might be the simple answer some people are looking for.

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