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Is there an efficient way that doesn't require too much fiddling (I can cope with a bit) to get version control working across > 1 environments? By that, I mean multiple IDEs; I am developing on VS2010 at home, but I'd like to work on the project at university with my laptop. My laptop is running Debian and I'm open to suggestion for what IDE to use there (in case there's a specific one that is pertinent to the solution.) I am primarily working in C++.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Based on your comments, it sounds like you are looking for more of a multi-platform build environment. Personally, I tend to use make, vi, and the command line for most things but that is pretty archaic to most. You might want to give cmake a try. The idea is to maintain a CMakeLists.txt file that describes the project. The cmake utility can generate project files for various platforms - Makefile for Linux, MSVS Solutions, etc. The other one that pops into mind is qmake from Qt. It works similar to cmake in that it generates build files for various environments from a single project description file.

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If you've got access to Team Foundation server I suggest you take a look at Microsoft Visual Studio Team Explorer Everywhere 2010. It supports a bunch of O/Ss and IDEs - not just Windows/Visual Studio

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Why did this get a negative rating? It is a perfectly viable solution. At least tell us all why it shouldn't be considered... –  JP. Jul 29 '10 at 1:23
    
Likely that this student does NOT have access to TFS. It is also quite expensive... not a good solution IMO either. –  Tim Jul 29 '10 at 1:53
    
a few years ago TFS was FREE to use (for about 5? Team members), and right now, you can use a hosted TFS from microsoft for 5 team members (visualstudio.com) –  relascope Jun 25 at 19:33

There are lots of cross-platform source code control systems. GIT and Subversion both have plugins for visual studio and clients for other platforms.

for example:

http://www.visualsvn.com/

http://ankhsvn.open.collab.net/

-- It sounds like your question is related to cross-platform IDEs...not cross-platform SCC. If you want to do dotNet projects cross platform then you should look at Mono and MonoDevelop:

http://mono-project.com/Main_Page

http://monodevelop.com

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So how would this work with either of them? If I make changes in Visual Studio, check them into the repository, then check those changes out on the other machine and open them with a different IDE, do they have support for that? What if I add a file to the project? The change is saved in the .vcproj file but the Unix IDE can't read that! Are you saying that GIT and Subversion can handle that with some configuration? –  anthony-arnold Jul 29 '10 at 0:58
    
I would suggest just using the explorer plugin (tortoise svn) for svn. I have not found any plugins to IDEs to be worth using. –  Tim Jul 29 '10 at 1:17
    
It sounds like your question is related to cross-platform IDEs...not cross-platform SCC. If you want to do dotNet projects cross platform then you should look at Mono and MonoDevelop: mono-project.com/Main_Page and monodevelop.com –  Zippit Jul 29 '10 at 1:52
    
I agree with Tim. I use subversion with several different languages/IDEs, as well as CAD files, images etc. and I like knowing that my source control behaves exactly the same for all of them. –  Jeanne Pindar Jul 29 '10 at 3:42

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