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I am making an application in netbeans and want to have a status label that tells what is going on in the program at any given moment. There is a ton of code, but here is pretty much what it does: Just pretend that statusLabel is a label that has already been put in the program and each of the functions is an expensive function that takes a few seconds.

statusLabel.setText("Completing Task 1");
System.out.println("Completing Task 1");
this.getFrame().repaint(); //I call this function and the two functions below it but the label still does not change.
statusLabel.updateUI(); //Doesn't seem to do much.
statusLabel.revalidate(); //Doesn't seem to do much.
this.completeTask1();
statusLabel.setText("Completing Task 2");
System.out.println("Completing Task 2");
statusLabel.revalidate();
this.getFrame().repaint();
...

This goes on until the UI has completed 4 tasks. During the entire process the label does not update until after every single task has been completed, and then it says "Completing Task 4". The System.out.println calls work perfectly though. Basically I am wondering what I should do to make the label show the new text that it has been set to.

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This requires multi-threading. Your label isn't updating because your only thread is being used to run the other code that is running in the "background", until it's finished, your GUI won't update. A common problem when multi-threading isn't used when it needs to be. Here is the Java Oracle tutorial on Concurrency, it has everything about multi-threading you need to know to solve your problem and is the perfect place to start learning about one of the more difficult and necessary concepts of programming. docs.oracle.com/j – CODe Nov 10 '12 at 4:41

CODe's answer is right, but I'd go with the SwingWorker class:

An abstract class to perform lengthy GUI-interacting tasks in a dedicated thread.

It's the right tool for your problem.

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