Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

diff usually produces rather clueless output. Here's a good example. If we start with this:

class World
  def hello
    puts "Hello, world"
  end
  def goodbye
    puts "Goodbye, world"
  end
end

Drop the second method and change the first:

class World
  def hello
    puts "Hello, #{self}"
  end
end

diff -u will be a total mess - suggesting two methods have been merged:

 class World
   def hello
-    puts "Hello, world"
-  end
-  def goodbye
-    puts "Goodbye, world"
+    puts "Hello, #{self}"
   end
 end

Instead of much more reasonable:

 class World
   def hello
-    puts "Hello, world"
+    puts "Hello, #{self}"
   end
-  def goodbye
-    puts "Goodbye, world"
-  end
 end

This is just a toy example, so diff's output is still possible to understand - in practice it usually gets a lot worse.

Are there any alternatives to diff that might be somewhat smarter?

share|improve this question
1  
Do you want CLI only, or will graphical apps like KDIFF work for you? –  OMG Ponies Jul 29 '10 at 4:58
    
Yeah I was going to say. Kompare is actually one of the best diffs out there, IMO. If you're not parsing the output, GUI-based diffs are much easier to work with than CLI diff. –  Gilead Jul 29 '10 at 5:07
1  
I don't want better display for bad diffs, I want good diffs. This looks like it might be relevant. –  taw Jul 29 '10 at 5:19

3 Answers 3

The rfcdiff (Draft Diff Tool) reported this:

enter image description here

The tool uses GNU diff and wdiff.

share|improve this answer

You might consider our SD Smart Differencer. It provides differences based on the structure of the code rather than "line differences", so it is focused on language elements (expressions, statements, blocks, methods) and editing actions (delete, insert, copy, replace, rename).

It is language specific; it has to be to use language structure as a guide. It uses an explicit langauge definition. I can't quite tell what langauge you are using (Python?). There are Smart Differencer tools for many langauges, including C, C++, C#, Java, Python, Fortran, COBOL, ...

share|improve this answer
    
The example is in Ruby. Smart Differencer looks like it's Windows-only, without support for most languages I want (and what they say about C preprocessor implies it won't even be able to diff most C), closed source (very bad idea for development tools), and I'm not even sure if a trial download to see if it works at all is available. Perhaps some other people will find it useful. –  taw Jul 31 '10 at 5:13
    
What languages did you want? Yes, there are limitations with C code due to the arbitrary placement of preprocessor directives and macro calls; these make it very hard to identify code structure in arbitrary C code. It doesn't presently work with Ruby; we've played with a Ruby language definition but it isnt ready yet.. Yes, it is closed source; you are welcome to write an open source version. You didn't state any of these as constraints in your question. There are evaluation versions available for a wide variety of languages, including Java, C# and C++. You might have to ask at the website –  Ira Baxter Jul 31 '10 at 5:55

I am working on a diff algorithm that does exactly what you want, but this algorithm I am working on has no limit on the number of sources for the diff process. Currently it is in beta and still being tested and until this testing is complete the inline view is not functional. Please check it out and let me know if and how you can break the diff report so that I may supply the appropriate corrections.

http://prettydiff.com/beta/

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.