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Hi I had performed a transformation which drops a tag if it is null.

I wanted to check whether my transformation is working fine, so instead of checking it manually, I wrote one more XSLT code which just checks the presence of that particular tag in the OUTPUT XML, if it is null, then the second XSLT should output a text "FOUND". (I don't actually need some XML kind of output but I am just using XSLT for searching.)

When I tried with this XSL code ::

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
  <xsl:template match="/SiebelMessage//SuppressCalendar[.!='']">
      FOUND
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

It outputs all the TEXT DATA that is present in the XML file,

to avoid that, I had to write this code::

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
  <xsl:template match="/SiebelMessage//SuppressCalendar[.!='']">
      FOUND
  </xsl:template>
  <xsl:template match="text()"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

why did the former code outputs TEXT, why should I insist XSL to ignore all other text? is that the behavior of all XML parsers or only of my own (I am using msxml parser).

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2 Answers

up vote 55 down vote accepted

why did the former code outputs TEXT, why should I insist XSL to ignore all other text? is that the behavior of all XML parsers or only of my own

You are discovering one of the most fundamental XSLT features as specified in the Specification: the built-in templates of XSLT.

From the Spec:

There is a built-in template rule to allow recursive processing to continue in the absence of a successful pattern match by an explicit template rule in the stylesheet. This template rule applies to both element nodes and the root node. The following shows the equivalent of the built-in template rule:

<xsl:template match="*|/">
  <xsl:apply-templates/>
</xsl:template>

There is also a built-in template rule for each mode, which allows recursive processing to continue in the same mode in the absence of a successful pattern match by an explicit template rule in the stylesheet. This template rule applies to both element nodes and the root node. The following shows the equivalent of the built-in template rule for mode m.

<xsl:template match="*|/" mode="m">
  <xsl:apply-templates mode="m"/>
</xsl:template>

There is also a built-in template rule for text and attribute nodes that copies text through:

<xsl:template match="text()|@*">
  <xsl:value-of select="."/>
</xsl:template>

The built-in template rule for processing instructions and comments is to do nothing.

<xsl:template match="processing-instruction()|comment()"/>

The built-in template rule for namespace nodes is also to do nothing. There is no pattern that can match a namespace node; so, the built-in template rule is the only template rule that is applied for namespace nodes.

The built-in template rules are treated as if they were imported implicitly before the stylesheet and so have lower import precedence than all other template rules. Thus, the author can override a built-in template rule by including an explicit template rule.

So, the reported behavior is the result of the application of the built-in templates -- the 1st and 2nd of all three of them.

It is a good XSLT design pattern to override the built-in templates with your own that will issue an error message whenever called so that the programmer immediately knows his transformation is "leaking":

For example, if there is this XML document:

<a>
  <b>
    <c>Don't want to see this</c>
  </b>
</a>

and it is processed with this transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="a|b">
   <xsl:copy>
      <xsl:attribute name="name">
        <xsl:value-of select="name()"/>
      </xsl:attribute>
      <xsl:apply-templates/>
   </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

the result is:

<a name="a">
   <b name="b">Don't want to see this</b>
</a>

and the programmer will be greatly confused how the unwanted text appeared.

However, just adding this catch-all template helps avoid any such confusion and catch errors immediately:

 <xsl:template match="*">
  <xsl:message terminate="no">
   WARNING: Unmatched element: <xsl:value-of select="name()"/>
  </xsl:message>

  <xsl:apply-templates/>
 </xsl:template>

Now, besides the confusing output the programmer gets a warning that explains the problem immediately:

 WARNING: Unmatched element: c
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2  
+1: Great explanation - much more complete than the accepted answer, though the accepted answer does also answer the specific question. –  Don Roby Jul 31 '10 at 15:22
    
@donroby: Thanks. Why would my answer not address the question and answer it?. Anybody having this problem and reading my answer will understand the cause of their problem and will be able to fix it. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 31 '10 at 16:17
    
@donroby: My reply provides an exact answer: "So, the reported behavior is the result of the application of the built-in templates -- the 2nd of all three of them" –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 31 '10 at 16:18
    
Yes, your reply does also answer the specific question. Didn't intend to imply otherwise. The intent was to not specifically deprecate the accepted answer. I do in fact prefer your answer though. –  Don Roby Jul 31 '10 at 16:55
2  
ya .. its complete set of info :) thank you very much :) –  InfantPro'Aravind' Aug 5 '10 at 13:33
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There are several built in template rules in XSL, one of which is this:

<xsl:template match="text()|@*">
  <xsl:value-of select="."/>
</xsl:template>

It outputs text.

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thanks, so is it specific to the particular parser, or in general? –  InfantPro'Aravind' Jul 29 '10 at 6:43
    
I guess, its general rule for all parsers 'coz its w3c specification. alright, thanks :) –  InfantPro'Aravind' Jul 29 '10 at 6:45
1  
@infant programmer - it is in the spec, as you have noted... all XSL parsers have to implement them. –  Oded Jul 29 '10 at 7:17
    
ok thanks :) got it. –  InfantPro'Aravind' Jul 29 '10 at 14:40
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