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I have a problem with sql query in php:

select
    user, name, outlet, switch, port, vlan, mac, status
from access where 
    user like '%'
    and name like '%'
    and outlet like '%'
    and switch like '%'
    and port like '%'
    and vlan like '%'
    and mac like '%'
    and status like '%'
order by 'user';

When running query on MySQL client version: 5.1.36 query doesn't work totally (ORDER BY won't work), however when running SAME query on MySQL client version: 4.1.13, ORDER BY works!

Any suggestions?

I have checked nearly all manuals about ORDER BY, WHERE, LIKE commands, but no result. No mention about version differences, etc..

Guys, thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have to remove the quotes from user in the ORDER BY clause. This is what is causing the ORDER BY not working as expected, because you can use any expression in the ORDER BY clause, and the 'user' in quotes is being considered an expression (constant) instead of a column name.

Test case (MySQL 5.1.45):

CREATE TABLE tb (id int);

INSERT INTO tb VALUES (5);
INSERT INTO tb VALUES (1);
INSERT INTO tb VALUES (4);
INSERT INTO tb VALUES (2);
INSERT INTO tb VALUES (3);

SELECT * FROM tb ORDER BY 'id';
+------+
| id   |
+------+
|    5 |
|    1 |
|    4 |
|    2 |
|    3 |
+------+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

SELECT * FROM tb ORDER BY id;
+------+
| id   |
+------+
|    1 |
|    2 |
|    3 |
|    4 |
|    5 |
+------+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)
share|improve this answer
    
Fixed the problem with code (copy paste mistake). The solution with quotes is working! Funny that, so it seems that v. 4.1.13 works with quotes, however v 5. does not. – AnzeT Jul 29 '10 at 7:21
    
Yes, that's interesting. However, I suggest not using quotes around column names. You can use backticks instead: user – Daniel Vassallo Jul 29 '10 at 7:25

I think what you need is:

SELECT `user`,`name`,`outlet`,`switch`,`port`,`vlan`,`mac`,`status` 
FROM `access`
WHERE `user` like '%' 
    AND `name` like '%'
    AND `outlet` like '%'
    AND `switch` like '%'
    AND `port` like '%'
    AND `vlan` like '%'
    AND `mac` like '%'
    AND `status` like '%' 
ORDER BY `user`;

Though I don't understand your WHERE clause. It doesn't filter on any of the fields. EDIT; some of your column names (user, name, port and status) could be MySQL keywords. Try enclosing them in grave accents (`) (I added them to my post as well).

share|improve this answer
    
Or better yet renaming them. Names like that set my teeth on edge. Arrggghh. – dkretz Jul 29 '10 at 7:20
    
` = Grave accent – Rfvgyhn Jul 29 '10 at 7:21
    
Thanks Rfvgyhn, I've updated my post. @le dorfier; you're absolutely right. – Lex Jul 29 '10 at 7:27

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