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How to pass optional parameters to a method in C# ?

Suppose i created one method called Sendcommand

public void SendCommand(String command,string strfilename)
{

    if (command == "NLST *" ) //Listing Files from Server.
    {
        //code
    }
    else if (command == "STOR " + Path.GetFileName(uploadfilename)) //Uploading file to Server
    {
        //code
    }
    else if ...
}

Now i want to call this method in main method like

Sendcommand("STOR ", filename);
Sendcommand("LIST"); // In this case i dont want to pass the second parameter

How to achieve that?

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possible duplicate of How can you use optional parameters in C#? –  Mark Ingram Jul 29 '10 at 8:55
    
Please see my answer: don't use just one method, use one method per command or a separate command class for each command –  Kieren Johnstone Jul 29 '10 at 8:57

12 Answers 12

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use the params attribute:

public void SendCommand(String command, params string[] strfilename)
{
}

then you can call it like this:

SendCommand("cmd");
SendCommand("cmd", "a");
SendCommand("cmd", "b");

or if you use C# 4.0 you can use the new optional arguments feature:

public void SendCommand(String command, string strfilename=null)
{ 
   if (strfilename!=null) .. 
}
share|improve this answer

Pre .NET 4 you need to overload the method:

public void sendCommand(String command)
{
    sendCommand(command, null);
}

.NET 4 introduces support for default parameters, which allow you to do all this in one line.

public void SendCommand(String command, string strfilename = null)
{
  //method body as in question
}

By the way, in the question as you have written it you aren't calling the method in your first example either:

Sendcommand("STOR " + filename);

is still using a single parameter which is the concatenation of the two strings.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought about this, but in this case, I'm not sure having one overload calling the other with 'null' is necessary, it seems likely that one set of commands would require the parameter, and another set wouldn't, so each overload just handles a different set of commands. –  Flynn1179 Jul 29 '10 at 8:49
    
Sorry it is comma Sendcommand("STOR ", filename); –  Swapnil Gupta Jul 29 '10 at 8:59

Check C# 4.0 Optional Parameters.

Also make sure you are using .NET 4.

If you need to use older versions of .NET.

Method overloading is the solution :

public void SendCommand(String command)
{
    SendCommand(command, null);
    // or SendCommand(command, String.Empty);
} 

public void SendCommand(String command, String fileName)
{
    // your code here
} 
share|improve this answer
    
It's overloading, not overriding :) –  BoltClock Jul 29 '10 at 9:20
    
Thanks, corrected. –  Incognito Jul 29 '10 at 9:36

There's three easy solutions to this one:

  1. Overload the method
  2. Allow the method to accept 'null', and handle appropriately
  3. Use .NET 4, which allows optional parameters
share|improve this answer

Create another method which calls the first?

public void SendCommand(String command)
{
    SendCommand(command, null);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I want in DotNet 3.5 any example please .... –  Swapnil Gupta Jul 29 '10 at 8:52

Overload the function. rather than checking for conditional branch. Something like this:

public void SendCommand(String command,string strfilename)
{    
    if (command == "STOR " + 
        Path.GetFileName(uploadfilename)) //Uploading file to Server
    {
        //code
    }
    else if ............
}

public void SendCommand(String command)
{ 
        //code

}
share|improve this answer

You can do this in a few ways. If you're using .NET 4.0, you can use optional parameters on the method:

public void SendCommand(String command,string strfilename = null)
{
    ....
}

Otherwise, you can just create another method which calls the method you already have but passing the default parameters you want to be optional:

public void SendCommand(String command)
{
    SendCommand(command,null);
}
share|improve this answer

Optional parameters feature come in c# 4.0 here is the link. Otherwise you have to write overloaded function.

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The obvious answer for this should be, don't do it that way.

You should either have a separate method for each command, or a command base class and a separate derived class for each command, with an Execute method.

It's bad design to have one method that handles every conceivable command.

Please vote this up guys, you really don't want one Sendcommand() to handle every possible command.

share|improve this answer
    
If I have 100 commands, I have to write 100 methods in that case ? –  Swapnil Gupta Jul 29 '10 at 9:43
    
Yes. It would be better to have 100 classes actually - one file with 100 methods is too many. Both of those options are a hundred times better than one method that handles the execution of 100 commands! Can you imagine how long that method would be, how hard it would be to debug, how many optional parameters it would have to have: probably indented so much it will be hard to see which { or } is which. You definitely, definitely, definitely don't want one method to handle all commands. One per command or one class per command. –  Kieren Johnstone Jul 29 '10 at 9:54

All of the answers given on this page are valid ways of accepting optional parameters, but in many cases, this is a sign that your method is trying to do too much.

In many cases you may be better off with the following unambiguous methods...

public void GetFileListFromServer()
{
    //Listing Files from Server.
    //code
}

public void UploadFileToServer(string strfilename)
{
    //Uploading file to Server
    //code
}
share|improve this answer

You can use params keyword :

private static void SendCommand(String command, params string[] filenames)
{

    if (command == "NLST *" ) //Listing Files from Server.
    {
        //code
    }

    if (command == "STOR ")
    {
        foreach (string fileName in filenames)
        {
            if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(fileName))
            {
                // code
            }
        }
    }
}

and you can use it as :

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    SendCommand("NLST *");
    SendCommand("STOR ", "myfile1.txt", "myfile.txt");
}
share|improve this answer

Folks,

I was looking at this thread, trying to solve a problem that doesn't actually exist, because C# "just passes through" a params array! Which I didn't know until I just tried it.

Here's an SSCCE:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics; // for Conditional compilation of method CONTENTS

namespace ConsoleApplication3
{
    public static class Log
    {
        [Conditional("DEBUG")] // active in Debug builds only (a no-op in Release builds)
        public static void Debug(string format, params object[] parms) {
            Console.WriteLine(format, parms); 
            // calls Console.WriteLine(string format, params object[] arg);
            // which I presume calls String.Format(string format, params object[] arg);
            // (Sweet! just not what I expected ;-)
        }
    }

    class Program //LogTest
    {
        static void Main(string[] args) {
            Log.Debug("args[0]={0} args[1]={1}", "one", "two");
            Console.Write("Press any key to continue . . .");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }

    }
}

Produces:

args[0]=one args[1]=two

Sweet!

But why? ... Well because (of course) the closest parameter-match to the heavily-overloaded Console.WriteLine method is (string format, params object[] arg) ... not (string format, object arg) as I was thinking.

I sort-of knew this had to be possible somehow, because (I presume) Console.WriteLine does it, I just somehow expected it to be HARD... and therefore think that the simplicity and "niceness" of this trick-of-the-language is note worthy.

CSharpLanguageDesigners.ToList().ForEach(dude=>dude.Kudos++);

Cheers. Keith.

PS: I wonder if VB.NET behaves the same way? I suppose it must.

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