Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been using this file-format below as an alternative for flat-text files, and I'm wondering if there is a name for it...

Say you have this data in a CSV:

FirstName,LastName,Email,UserName,Notes
Bob,Smith,bsmith@email.com,bsmith,Bob likes chicken
John,Doe,jdoe@email.com,jdoe,
Steve,Jobs,STEVE@apple.com,STEVE,Steve Jobs likes things that start with "i"

In this "other" file format, there are 3 columns:

  1. Unique ID
  2. Attribute Name
  3. Value

The above data would look like this:

bmsith@email.com,FirstName,Bob
bmsith@email.com,LastName,Smith
bmsith@email.com,Email,bmsith@email.com
bmsith@email.com,UserName,bsmith
bmsith@email.com,Notes,Bob likes chicken
jdoe@email.com,FirstNameJohn
jdoe@email.com,LastName,Doe
jdoe@email.com,Email,jdoe@email.com
jdoe@email.com,UserName,jdoe
STEVE@apple.com,FirstName,Steve
STEVE@apple.com,LastName,Jobs
STEVE@apple.com,Email,STEVE@apple.com
STEVE@apple.com,UserName,STEVE
STEVE@apple.com,Notes,Steve Jobs likes things that start with "i"

I actually delimit on tab, but comma is easier to read for this. And in this example, any of the attributes could be used as a unique identifier.

share|improve this question
    
Question isn't particularly clear- could you elaborate? –  tomfanning Jul 29 '10 at 15:44
    
Is this a format you created or something being required by another system? –  David Jul 29 '10 at 15:44
2  
Why would you use this format? It seems terribly inefficient. What's the benefit? –  tzaman Jul 29 '10 at 15:46
3  
Don't take this personally but the more I look at the second example you give the more brain dead it is. –  tomfanning Jul 29 '10 at 15:48
    
I updated the example to be more complete... the benefit it you don't need to have all of the attributes in a header row (so you could have thousands of attribute names with still having 3 columns...), and you don't end up with NULLs if a row doesn't have a specific attribute... you just omit that line –  jcoon Jul 29 '10 at 15:54

5 Answers 5

It's still CSV. You're just presenting the data from a different aspect, in terms of its structure, not its content.

share|improve this answer
    
Understandable... I'm wondering if there is a name though. It is CSV (or tab delimited), but it's not "flat-text"... is it something else? –  jcoon Jul 29 '10 at 15:56
    
It's Entity Attribute Value –  jcoon Jul 29 '10 at 18:00
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Took some time, but I found it.. it's Entity Attribute Value (EAV).

share|improve this answer

If you delimit on tab then it's a tab-delimited file. But I don't think there is a proprietary name for the particular format you show.

share|improve this answer

The structure is called Key-Value table. And you have serialized that table as a CSV file.

share|improve this answer

I never saw this kind of data description before. But since it's in a coma separated format, I suppose it's still called CSV:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comma-separated_values

But I think this way of saving this way uses a lot of unnecessary bytes since you repeat the uniqueID a lot and the attribute names too. The only advantage I can see is that the data can be randomly placed in a file. Other than that, text files are usually read sequentially.

--- Edit ---

From the wiki, there is a list of human readable formats. If none of them suits you and still want to use your format and use a name, you could always use a more generic name like Delimiter separated value instead of CSV or invent a new one like key-field-value (KFV).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.