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Today my rails application on remote server suddenly stop working. All errors are in the form

Processing UsersController#update (for **ip** at 2010-07-29 10:52:27) [PUT]
  Parameters: {"commit"=>"Update", "action"=>"update", "_method"=>"put", "authenticity_token"=>"ysiDvO5s7qhJQrnlSR2+f8jF1gxdB7T9I2ydxpRlSSk=", **more parameters**}

ActionController::InvalidAuthenticityToken (ActionController::InvalidAuthenticityToken):

This happens for every non-get request and, as you see, authenticity_token is there.

Have you seen anything like that? Thanks!

PS On the web I've found a suggestion to remove 'tmp' folder, didn't help.

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6 Answers 6

I had the same issue but with pages which were page cached. Pages got buffered with a stale authenticity token and all actions using the methods post/put/delete where recognized as forgery attempts. Error (422 Unprocessable Entity) was returned to the user.

The solution:
Add:

 skip_before_filter :verify_authenticity_token  

or as "sagivo" pointed out in Rails 4 add:

 skip_before_action :verify_authenticity_token

On pages which do caching.
For example:

 caches_page :index, :show  
 skip_before_filter :verify_authenticity_token, :only => [:index, :show]

Reference: http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/RequestForgeryProtection/ClassMethods.html

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2  
That's not likely the case, I didn't know of caches_page before your post. But I'll check caches_page out, thanks. –  Nikita Rybak Aug 30 '10 at 18:01
1  
in rails 4 skip_before_action :verify_authenticity_token –  sagivo Feb 27 at 17:48

For me the cause of this issue under Rails 4 was a missing,

<%= csrf_meta_tags %>

Line in my main application layout. I had accidently deleted it when I rewrote my layout.

If this isn't in the main layout you will need it in any page that you want a CSRF token on.

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that was my problem too, thanks! –  ksiomelo Mar 12 at 12:20
    
This was my problem too. –  Dennis Best Mar 23 at 20:22

The authenticity token is a random value generated in your view to prove a request is submitted from a form on your site, not somewhere else. This protects against CSRF attacks:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross-site_request_forgery

Check to see who that client/IP is, it looks like they are using your site without loading your views.

If you need to debug further, this question is a good place to start: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/941594/understand-rails-authenticity-token

Edited to explain: It means they are calling the action to process your form submit without ever rendering your form on your website. This could be malicious (say posting spam comments) or it could indicate a customer trying to use your web service API directly. You're the only one who can answer that by the nature of your product and analyzing your requests.

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Thanks, but I already know what authenticity token is. Check to see who that client/IP is, it looks like they are using your site without loading your views. Sorry, what "without loading views" means? –  Nikita Rybak Jul 29 '10 at 16:20
    
I means that somebody (probably a spammer) could be submitting data to your form without going through your application's user interface. It's possible to do this using a command line program such as curl, for example. –  John Topley Jul 29 '10 at 16:32
    
John has it exactly right. It means they are calling the action to process your form submit without ever rendering your form on your website. This could be malicious (say posting spam comments) or it could indicate a customer trying to use your web service API directly. You're the only one who can answer that by the nature of your product and analyzing your requests. –  Winfield Jul 29 '10 at 16:35
    
Ok, I misunderstood Winfield's comment. I thought the app wasn't somehow configured to 'load my views' when I use browser. –  Nikita Rybak Jul 29 '10 at 16:36
1  
I also had another thought, these requests include a token, but it's not valid. This could be caused by caching the page rendering your form or something else that causes a stale version of the form potentially. –  Winfield Jul 29 '10 at 16:43
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Problem solved by downgrading to 2.3.5 from 2.3.8. (as well as infamous 'You are being redirected.' issue)

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I was having this issue with javascript calls. I fixed that with just requiring jquery_ujs into application.js file.

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too late to answer but I found the solution.

When you define you own html form then you miss authentication token string that should be sent to controller for security reasons. But when you use rails form helper to generate a form you get something like following

    <form accept-charset="UTF-8" action="/login/signin" method="post"><div style="display:none"><input name="utf8" type="hidden" value="&#x2713;" /><input name="authenticity_token" type="hidden" value="x37DrAAwyIIb7s+w2+AdoCR8cAJIpQhIetKRrPgG5VA=" ...

So the solution to the problem is either to add authenticity_token field or use rails form helpers rather then removing , downgrading or upgrading rails.

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