Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

In my database I have certain tables that have confidential information. Each of these tables contains an empty field called "ThisTableIsConfidential". I have a function that correctly displays a list of the tables that have this field in the Immediate window. Now I want to display the list on a form and I can't figure out how to do it. I thought to put the function in a query and display that in a listbox but the query didn't work. Any ideas?

This is the function (I cobbled it together from a few different online sources):

Function GetConfidentialTable()
 Dim db As Database, tbl As TableDef, fld As Field, currentTable As String
   Set db = CurrentDb

   For Each tbl In db.TableDefs
        If (tbl.Attributes = 0) Then  

        currentTable = tbl.Name

        If FieldExists(currentTable, "ThisTableIsConfidential") = True Then
            Debug.Print currentTable
        End If
     End If

   Next tbl
End Function
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can set the listbox row source type to Value List and then use your function to return a list:

Function GetConfidentialTable()
 Dim db As Database, tbl As TableDef, fld As Field, currentTable As String
   Set db = CurrentDb

   For Each tbl In db.TableDefs
        If (tbl.Attributes = 0) Then  

        currentTable = tbl.Name

        If FieldExists(currentTable, "ThisTableIsConfidential") = True Then
            sList = sList & ";" & currentTable
        End If
     End If

   Next tbl

   GetConfidentialTable = Mid(sList,2)
End Function
share|improve this answer
    
That was it, thank you! I had to tweak your answer slightly as follows: 1. I changed sList to this: sList = sList & currentTable & vbCrLf to add a line break so that it displayed as a list rather than a long string. 2. Once I did that Access required that the element was a text box to display the entire thing rather than a list box (which only displayed the first line). 3. Also this meant I could change GetConfidentialTable = Mid(sList,2) to GetConfidentialTable = sList Thank you for this! –  Tara Jul 29 '10 at 17:12
    
@Tara If that is what suits you, but I do not think it is a good idea for the longer term. It was not necessary to change the code or to use a textbox. I think you must have missed my comment that you must set the row source type to Value list (property sheet for the listbox) –  Fionnuala Jul 29 '10 at 17:28
    
I did that and it didn't work. –  Tara Jul 29 '10 at 17:31
    
Had you made any other changes to the listbox, such as setting the number of columns? I have tested the above, and it works on a new list box with the single change of setting the Row Source Type. This is by means an unusual thing to do, and the approach is standard. –  Fionnuala Jul 29 '10 at 19:14
    
@Remou's code produces a proper string to assign as the value list of a listbox formatted with a single column. –  David-W-Fenton Jul 30 '10 at 19:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.