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Is there something similar in PHP to the try ... else in Python?

I need to know if the try block executed correctly as when the block executed correctly, a message will be printed.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can use try { } catch () { } and throw. See http://php.net/manual/en/language.exceptions.php

try {
    $a = 13/0; // should throw exception
} catch (Exception $e) {
    echo 'Caught exception: ',  $e->getMessage(), "\n";
}

or manually:

try {
    throw new Exception("I don't want to be tried!");
} catch (Exception $e) {
    echo 'Caught exception: ',  $e->getMessage(), "\n";
}
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Care to explain the downvote? Did I make a mistake? –  MvanGeest Jul 29 '10 at 16:30
1  
I didn't downvote, but he was asking about the else block, not exceptions in general... –  ircmaxell Jul 29 '10 at 16:37
    
Oh, and $a = 13/0; will not throw an exception unless you have an error handler installed that throws exceptions (set_error_handler(function($errno, $errstr, $errfile, $errline) { throw new ErrorException($errstr, 0, $errno, $errfile, $errline);});... php.net/manual/en/class.errorexception.php) –  ircmaxell Jul 29 '10 at 17:13
    
Is PHP's "catch" block not equivalent to Python's "else" block? –  enobrev Jul 29 '10 at 17:43
    
@enobrev: No it isn't. See my answer below. –  webbiedave Jul 29 '10 at 17:52

PHP does not have try/catch/else. You could however set a variable in the catch block that can be used to determine if it was run:

$caught = false;

try {
    // something
} catch (Exception $e) {
    $caught = true;
}

if (!$caught) {

}
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This gets full of $caught = true; statements if there are several catch blocks. –  Artefacto Jul 29 '10 at 16:25
    
But that's how the python else works as well. –  webbiedave Jul 29 '10 at 16:28
    
One minor note, python's else block would only be executed if $caught is false, not true... –  ircmaxell Jul 29 '10 at 18:05
    
Thanks ircmaxell. Edited. –  webbiedave Jul 29 '10 at 19:06

I think the "else" clause is a bit limiting, unless you don't care about any exceptions thrown there (or you want to bubble those exceptions)... From my understanding of Python, it's basically the equivalent of this:

try {
    //...Do Some Stuff Here
    try {
        // Else block code here
    } catch (Exception $e) {
        $e->elseBlock = true;
        throw $e;
    }
} catch (Exception $e) {
    if (isset($e->elseBlock) && $e->elseBlock) {
        throw $e;
    }
    // catch block code here
}

So it's a bit more verbose (since you need to re-throw the exceptions), but it also bubbles up the stack the same as the else clause...

Edit Or, a bit cleaner version (5.3 only)

class ElseException extends Exception();

try {
    //...Do Some Stuff Here
    try {
        // Else block code here
    } catch (Exception $e) {
        throw new ElseException('Else Clasuse Exception', 0, $e);
    }
} catch (ElseException $e) {
    throw $e->getPrevious();
} catch (Exception $e) {
    // catch block code here
}

Edit 2

Re-reading your question, I think you may be overcomplicating things with an "else" block... If you're just printing (which isn't likely to throw an exception), you don't really need an else block:

try {
    // Do Some stuff
    print "Success";
} catch (Exception $e) {
    //Handle error here
    print "Error";
}

That code will only ever print either Success or Error... Never both (since if the print function throws the exception, it won't be actually printed... But I don't think the print CAN throw exceptions...).

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Not familiar with python but it sounds like you're after Try Catch blocks used with exceptions...

http://php.net/manual/en/language.exceptions.php

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There is try-catch in php.

Example:

function inverse($x) {
    if (!$x) {
        throw new Exception('Division by zero.');
    }
    else return 1/$x;
}

try {
    echo inverse(5) . "\n";
    echo inverse(0) . "\n";
} catch (Exception $e) {
    echo 'Caught exception: ',  $e->getMessage(), "\n";
}

// Continue execution
echo 'Hello World';
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try {
    $clean = false;
    ...
    $clean = true;
} catch (...) { ... }

if (!$clean) {
    //...
}

That's the best you can do.

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You should set $clean to it's initial value before you enter the try..catch block. See webbiedave's answer. –  jmz Jul 29 '10 at 19:08
    
@jmz Hum? Why? it's indifferent; there's no block scope in PHP. –  Artefacto Jul 29 '10 at 20:28

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