Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a template that I would like to conditionally compile depending on the type of the argument. I only care about differentiating between "Plain Old Data" (POD), i.e., integers, etc or classes/structs. I'm using c++ VS2008 on Windows.

template<T>
class foo
{
    void bar(T do_something){
    #if IS_POD<T>
        do something for simple types
    #else
        do something for classes/structs
    #endif
}}

I've been looking at the boost library's and I can see that they appear to have what I want. However, I do not understand what the correct syntax for the #if statement would be.

Any help would be appreciated.


Edit --- After reading the responses, I see I overlooked something in my definition of the question. Class foo is a templated class that only needs to instance the version of bar that is correct for class type T. I was looking for a solution that can be resolved a compile time. Hope this clears up my problem.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can do it without enable_if, because all you need is to dispatch depending on type traits. enable_if is used to add/remove template instantiations to/from overload resolution. You may want to use call traits to choose the best method to pass objects to your function. As a rule, objects should be passed by reference, whereas POD is passed by value. call_traits let's you choose between const and non-const references. The code below uses const reference.

#include <boost/type_traits.hpp>
#include <boost/call_traits.hpp>

template <typename T>
class foo {
public:
    void bar(typename boost::call_traits<T>::param_type obj) {
        do_something(obj, boost::is_pod<T>());
    }
private:
    void do_something(T obj, const boost::true_type&)
    {
      // do something for POD
    }
    void do_something(const T& obj, const boost::false_type&)
    {
      // do something for classes
    }
};
share|improve this answer

You can't solve this with the preprocessor, since it doesn't know about C++. (It's a dumb text replacement tool.) Use templates to do this.

Assuming IsPod<T>::result returns something alike Boolean<true>/Boolean<false>:

template<T>
class foo
{
    void do_something(T obj, Boolean<true> /*is_pod*/)
    {
      // do something for simple types
    }
    void do_something(T obj, Boolean<false> /*is_pod*/)
    {
      // do something for classes/structs
    }

    void bar(T obj)
    {
       do_something(obj, IsPod<T>::result());
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Using preprocessor here is not possible. Have a look at Boost Enable If library instead.

Specifically, in your case it would look like (not tested):

void bar (typename enable_if <is_pod <T>, T>::type do_something)
{
    // if is POD
}

void bar (typename disable_if <is_pod <T>, T>::type do_something)
{
    // if not
}
share|improve this answer
    
This will be a compile error, once the class template is instantiated, T is fixed, and at that point when you try to call bar it will see the two definitions and it will fail to compile one of them. Note that this is not SFINAE, since it will not be a substitution failure --the type is fixed before the instantiation of the member (or so I think, I am never sure with these things :)). –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 29 '10 at 23:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.