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I am using ggplot2 (respectively qplot) to generate a report with Sweave. Now I need some help with the adjustment of the size of the plot. I use the following Sweave code to include it.

\begin{figure}[htbp]
\begin{center}
<<fig=true,echo=false>>=
print(mygraph)
@
\caption{MyCaption}
\end{center}
\end{figure}

If I add a width argument (like shown below) to plot is squeezed down, but not really scaled down.

<<fig=true,echo=false,width=3>>=

If I use ggsave() instead, I could use a scale argument and influence the size of the resulting .pdf file. Is there a way to influence the dimensions of the plot without saving it (since the .pdf is generated by Sweave anyway) ? Is there anything I need to add to my qplot code?

mygraph=qplot(date,value,data=graph1,geom="line",colour=variable,xlab="",ylab="")
+ scale_y_continuous(limits = c(-0.3,0.3))

Thx for any suggestions in advance!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Instead of doing this within ggplot2, add the following LaTeX code before the code chunk where you print the graph.

\SweaveOpts{width=x, height=y}

x and y are height and width in inches.

If there is a particular aspect ratio you would like your plot to be, you can set this in ggplot2 with opts(). Unless I have some other reason, I usually try to keep my plots scaled to the golden ratio, per Tufte's suggestions. Usually I have

...
SweaveOpts{width=8, height=5}
...
<<label = "makeplot", echo = F>>=
  p <- ggplot(mpg, aes(displ, hwy)) + 
    geom_point()+
    opts(aspect.ratio = 2/(1+sqrt(5)) )
@
...
\begin{figure}[htbp]
\begin{center}
<<fig=true,echo=false>>=
  print(p)
@
\caption{MyCaption}
\end{center}
\end{figure}
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Great answer! (accepted). +1 for anticipating that it's not solely a Sweave problem, but an aspect.ratio thing. –  Matt Bannert Jul 30 '10 at 8:35
1  
Scatterplots are usually best with a square aspect ratio - a priori there is not usually reason to favour one variable over the other. –  hadley Jul 30 '10 at 17:28

The Sweave options width and height influence the dimensions of the PDF file but not the size of the figures in the document. Put something like

\setkeys{Gin}{width=0.4\textwidth}

after \begin{document} to get smaller plots.

Source: Sweave manual, sec. 4.1.2

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