Sign up ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I tried the <input type="number" /> but on Opera that outputs a strange input box coupled with an "up and down" handler. What I expected was a regular text field that once you focus on it prompts the number keyboard instead of the alphabets. Is that even possible?

p.s. I'm not trying to validate. It would be a nice user experience, that's all.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

type="number" is HTML5 and many phones do not support HTML5. For call link you can use type="tel" or <A href="wtai://wp/mc;600112233">Special A</A>. You should look at CSS WAP extensions (page 56) too.

share|improve this answer
i read that document, nothing there that makes a number pad prompt instad of alphabet, so it doesnt look like the future holds any hope for web developers :( i'll take that as a final answer –  Ayyash Jul 31 '10 at 3:05
3 comments: ① <a> is for links, not inputs. You asked about input fields, so why is the best answer one that doesn't answer your question? ② Given that WAP2 is XHTML MP (a light version of HTML), his statement "many phone don´t support HTML" means you can't use WAP2 on those phones anyway. ③ WAP is dead—see WAP Site vs. Traditional HTML for a Mobile Website & What's different between HTML and WML/WAP?. –  Dori Jul 31 '10 at 4:50
@Ayyash, sry i think i confussed with input and a. Anyway input type="number" is HTML5. You could use in iphone and android phones and i hope in future nokia browser. –  fravelgue Aug 2 '10 at 9:13
@Dori WAP is dead (like HTML5 kill xhtml, do you know?!). But there are many browser that only support it, and there is functions of WAP that you can use in HTML MP. Remember every country is not USA or europe. –  fravelgue Aug 2 '10 at 9:16
input type=tel is absolutely ignored by Opera Mobile, a regular keyboard is shown instead. –  Andrew Sep 12 '14 at 18:51

The official HTML5 way to handle phone numbers is:

<input type="tel">

You may not have liked the "strange input box" you got with Opera when you used<input type="number" />, but that really is the appropriate type of input area when you want to require visitors to enter a numeric value.

share|improve this answer
but the "type=number" did not prompt the number pad, i'll try the tel type –  Ayyash Jul 31 '10 at 2:12
im using opera 10 on windows mobile 6.5, i think its got some HTML5 in it, i know ive seen <a href="tel:"> work, input type didnt work though –  Ayyash Jul 31 '10 at 2:54
The type="number" attribute isn't necessarily supposed to bring up a number pad. The question is: are you trying to force users to enter in a numeric value, or enter in a phone number? For the former, type="number" is what you want. For the latter, type="tel" (the telephone keypad, including # and *) is what you're looking for. <a href="tel:"> isn't an input field; it's a link to dial a phone number. Example: <a href="tel:1-408-555-5555">1-408-555-5555</a>. –  Dori Jul 31 '10 at 5:01
@Ayyash, I'm not pissed off—I just think you're not paying attention. You asked about input in Mobile Opera. I told you how input works for the browsers installed on many 2010-era mobile phones. @fravelgue told you that many phones don't support HTML (irrelevant, because Opera does), how one type of link works (irrelevant, because they're not inputs), and about a 2001 WAP CSS specification which doesn't apply to Opera or to WAP v1 or to HTML input fields. And btw: no, you never did say that input type=tel didn't work for you—you said "i'll try the tel type" but never reported your results. –  Dori Aug 5 '10 at 1:48
yes i did, look above –  Ayyash Aug 7 '10 at 9:58

This post is now invalid. All smartphones support HTML5 and CSS3 now, so adding type="number" does in fact prompt the number pad to pop-up. I just checked it on 2 different Android versions, and an iPhone. Just so no one in the future tries WAP instead of the correct HTML5 format.

share|improve this answer

Use pattern="[0-9]*"

  • Example number input: <input type="number" pattern="[0-9]*" />

  • Example phone input: <input type="tel" pattern="[0-9]*" />

Note: Browsers that do not support type="tel" will default to a text type

Beware: Using type="number" can cause problems with some browsers and user experience for credit card, postal code, and telephone inputs where a user might need to enter punctuation or a comma being in the output.


share|improve this answer

Your Answer


By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.