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Possible Duplicate:
Can’t operator == be applied to generic types in C#?

I've got the following generic class and the compiler complains that "Operator '!=' cannot be applied to operands of type 'TValue' and 'TValue'" (see CS0019):

public class Example<TValue>
{
    private TValue _value;
    public TValue Value
    {
        get { return _value; }
        set
        {
            if (_value != value) // <<-- ERROR
            {
                _value= value;
                OnPropertyChanged("Value");
            }
        }
    }
}

If I constrain TValue to class, I could use Object.Equals(). Since I need this for boths structs and classes I'd be very happy if I could avoid that though.

So the question is, how can I compare two elements of the same but unconstrained generic type for equality?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by nawfal, Kate Gregory, CloudyMarble, Jack, Andrew Alcock Feb 4 '13 at 5:42

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
Why can't you use .Equals for value types? – Lasse V. Karlsen Dec 3 '08 at 11:52
    
By default, if you call "object.Equals(a, b)" on reference types, then "object.ReferenceEquals(a, b)" will be called. – TcKs Dec 3 '08 at 11:55
    
@TcKs: By default, you cannot be sure if Equals has been overriden in a derived class. – leppie Dec 3 '08 at 12:52
    
@Iepie: Yes, and if is overriden the equality operator (and Equals method), then this methods should know how to compare two object better than default implementation. So it should returns correct resutls. – TcKs Dec 3 '08 at 12:58
    
@Tcks: True, brainfart on my part :) – leppie Dec 3 '08 at 18:47
up vote 12 down vote accepted

Did you try something like this?

public class Example<TValue>
{
    private TValue _value;
    public TValue Value
    {
        get { return _value; }
        set
        {

            if (!object.Equals(_value, value))
            {
                _value = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("Value");
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/w4hkze5k.aspx says that by default value types will be compared bitwise, else the Equals() method is used. That's what I was looking for. – David Schmitt Dec 3 '08 at 13:10
4  
Note that this will incur boxing penalties for value types. – Jon Skeet Dec 3 '08 at 13:53
public static bool operator ==(EntityBase<T> entity1, EntityBase<T> entity2)
        {
            if ((object)entity1 == null && (object)entity2 == null)
            {
                return true;
            }

            if ((object)entity1 == null || (object)entity2 == null)
            {
                return false;
            }

            if (Comparer<T>.Default.Compare(entity1.Id, entity2.Id) != 0)
            {
                return false;
            }

            return true;
        }
share|improve this answer

Three options:

  • Constrain TValue to implement IEquatable<TValue> and then call x.Equals(y)
  • Take another parameter of type IEqualityComparer<TValue> and use that
  • Use EqualityComparer<TValue>.Default to perform the comparisons

You could always mix and match options 2 and 3, of course - default to the default comparer, but also allow a specific one to be provided.

share|improve this answer

Is IComparable an option?

public class Example<TValue> where TValue: IComparable
{
    private TValue _value;
    public TValue Value
    {
        get { return _value; }
        set
        {

            if (_value.CompareTo(value) != 0)
            {
                _value = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("Value");
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I think the != operator cannot be applied here because there are cases where it can't be used. For instance, != can't be used for comparing structs, unless the compare operators (== !=) are overloaded.

Of course, you can compare language structs, like int != int, but I'm not sure how this is implemented.

So, because TValue can be a custom struct, it cannot use the != operator.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that was my understanding of CS0019 too. – David Schmitt Dec 3 '08 at 13:06
  • Equals() for value types
  • ReferenceEquals() for reference types
share|improve this answer
1  
I'd rather avoid having to reflect or otherwise distinguish the two cases. Currently I'm using an abstract base and implement these bits twice :-/ – David Schmitt Dec 3 '08 at 12:16
    
What reflection are you using? Doing a typeof(TValue) is a compile time constant, and checking that type wont really cost anything. – leppie Dec 3 '08 at 12:51

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