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I try to write xpath expressions so that my tests won't be broken by small design changes. So instead of the expressions that Selenium IDE generates, I write my own.

Here's an issue:

//input[@name='question'][7]

This expression doesn't work at all. Input nodes named 'question' are spread across the page. They're not siblings.

I've tried using intermediate expression, but it also fails.

(//input[@name='question'])[2]
error = Error: Element (//input[@name='question'])[2] not found

That's why I suppose Seleniun has a wrong implementation of XPath.

According to XPath docs, the position predicate must filter by the position in the nodeset, so it must find the seventh input with the name 'question'. In Selenium this doesn't work. CSS selectors (:nth-of-kind) neither.

I had to write an expression that filters their common parents:

//*[contains(@class, 'question_section')][7]//input[@name='question']

Is this a Selenium specific issue, or I'm reading the specs wrong way? What can I do to make a shorter expression?

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Good question (+1). See my answer for a detailed explanation and a solution to the problem. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 30 '10 at 13:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Here's an issue:

//input[@name='question'][7]   

This expression doesn't work at all.

This is a FAQ.

[] has a higher priority than //.

The above expression selects every input element with @name = 'question', which is the 7th child of its parent -- and aparently the parents of input elements in the document that is not shown don't have so many input children.

Use (note the brackets):

(//input[@name='question'])[7]

This selects the 7th element input in the document that satisfies the conditions in the predicate.

Edit:

People, who know Selenium (Dave Hunt) suggest that the above expression is written in Selenium as:

xpath=(//input[@name='question'])[7]
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I've tried this before: (//input[@name='question'])[2], error = Error: Element (//input[@name='question'])[2] not found –  culebrón Jul 30 '10 at 16:46
2  
Then use Dave Hunt's answer -- this has better chances to be supported by what Selenium calls "XPath". –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 30 '10 at 18:38
5  
Note that Selenium will only interpret a locator as XPath if it starts with // or xpath= so starting with a ( will default to attempt locating the element by identifier (id or name). –  Dave Hunt Jul 30 '10 at 21:46
3  
@Dave-Hunt: So, will xpath=(//input[@name='question'])[7] then be acceptable? –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 31 '10 at 0:55
1  
Yes, I suspect that would work in Selenium. –  Dave Hunt Jul 31 '10 at 8:42

If you want the 7th input with name attribute with a value of question in the source then try the following:

/descendant::input[@name='question'][7]
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I'm fairly sure that // is an exact synonym for descendant-or-self::, so I don't think this would help. –  AakashM Jul 30 '10 at 13:46
1  
You are correct, but descendant-or-self is not a direct synonym for descendant. See w3.org/TR/xpath/#path-abbrev "NOTE: The location path //para[1] does not mean the same as the location path /descendant::para[1]. The latter selects the first descendant para element; the former selects all descendant para elements that are the first para children of their parents." –  Dave Hunt Jul 30 '10 at 21:43
2  
Correct answe (+1). –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 31 '10 at 0:56

protected by bmargulies Jun 25 '11 at 22:21

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