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I am constructing a URL at runtime. So far I have done like

public string BuildURLAndNavigate(CodeType codeType)
{    
    string vURL = string.Empty; 

    string mstrNavServer = "http://some.com/nav";
    vURL = ConcatenateString(mstrNavServer , "/somepage.asp?app=myapp");

    //Build Code Type
    switch (codeType)
    {
    case CodeType.Series:
        vURL = ConcatenateString(vURL , "&tools=ser");
        break; 
    case CodeType.DataType:
        vURL = ConcatenateString(vURL , "&tools=dt");
        break;
    }

    //build version 
    string VER_NUM = "5.0";
    vURL = ConcatenateString(vURL , ConcatenateString("&vsn=" , VER_NUM));         
    return vURL;
    }

    private string ConcatenateString(string expression1, string expression2)
    {
        return string.Concat(expression1 + expression2);
    }

But I am not happy with the one I am doing.

I am sure that there is definitely a best practice / better approach than this.

Kindly help me out in guiding for the same.

Thanks

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1  
What are you not happy with? What do you thing the deficiencies are? –  Oded Jul 30 '10 at 7:21

9 Answers 9

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Never build urls using strings, string builders, string concatenations.

You could start by defining a custom collection which will take care of properly URL encoding any value being added to it:

public class HttpNameValueCollection : NameValueCollection
{
    public override void Add(string name, string value)
    {
        base.Add(name, HttpUtility.UrlEncode(value));
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return string.Join("&", Keys.Cast<string>().Select(
            key => string.Format("{0}={1}", key, this[key])));
    }
}

And then simply:

public string BuildURLAndNavigate()
{
    var uriBuilder = new UriBuilder("http://some.com/nav/somepage.asp");
    var values = new HttpNameValueCollection();
    values.Add("app", "myapp");

    switch (codeType)
    {
        case CodeType.Series:
            values.Add("tools", "ser");
            break;
        case CodeType.DataType:
            values.Add("tools", "dt");
            break;
    }

    // You could even do things like this without breaking your urls
    values.Add("p", "http://www.example.com?p1=v1&p2=v2");


    string VER_NUM = "5.0";
    values.Add("vsn", VER_NUM);
    uriBuilder.Query = values.ToString();
    return uriBuilder.ToString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why never use concatenation? He is not concatenating user-inputted values into his URL. He is only concatenating constant values. So there is no chance of any form of injection attack. While I really like this code example and could see it's usefulness in many cases (and I intend to steal it for my own personal use :) in this case it really feels like pushing a thumbtack with a sledgehammer. –  Zippit Jul 30 '10 at 7:50
    
I am always promoting best practices. Yes, in this case there cannot be an injection but maybe this is an oversimplified version of the real code. Maybe tomorrow there will be another developer that will come to the project and add some dynamic parameter value. –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 30 '10 at 7:54
    
Also StackOverflow is a well referenced site. There are hundreds of developers constantly copy-pasting code snippets from the accepted answer without really understanding what it does (as they believe that if it worked in his case it will work in mine too) and they are surprised when they get night calls from angry customers that do not understand why the application truncates values they enter in the textbox :-) –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 30 '10 at 7:59

You could use a StringBuilder:

public string BuildURLAndNavigate(CodeType codeType) 
{  
    StringBuilder vURL = new StringBuilder();

    vURL.Append("http://some.com/nav"); 
    vURL.Append("/somepage.asp?app=myapp"); 

    //Build Code Type 
    switch (codeType) 
    { 
        case CodeType.Series: 
            vURL.Append("&tools=ser"); 
            break;  
        case CodeType.DataType: 
            vURL.Append("&tools=dt"); 
            break; 
    } 

    //build version  
    string VER_NUM = "5.0"; 
    vURL.AppendFormat("&vsn={0}", VER_NUM);          

    return vURL.ToString(); 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
string builder is overkill here. For the amount of concatenation going on here you are likely going to see more of a perf hit then any boost. –  Zippit Jul 30 '10 at 7:43
    
Not necesarily. (keep one string builder around). It also allows a more flexbile API with AppendFormat included ;) –  TomTom Jul 30 '10 at 7:55

Do

return string.Concat(expression1, expression2);

not

return string.Concat(expression1 + expression2);
share|improve this answer
    
Haha, good spot :) –  cjk Jul 30 '10 at 7:55

wouldn't the right way to do that be to use the Uri-class or the UriBuilder class?

for example the Uri ctor overload Uri(Uri, string):

public Uri(
   Uri baseUri,
   string relativeUri
);


Uri baseUri = new Uri("http://www.contoso.com");
Uri myUri = new Uri(baseUri, "catalog/shownew.htm");
Console.WriteLine(myUri.ToString());

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa332624(v=VS.71).aspx

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What you are doing is fine - it is simple and understandable. Anyone who reads the code can understand what you are doing.

In terms of performance - you are not doing much string manipulation, so unless you are building huge strings or doing this operation thousands of times a minute, you will not gain much by using StringBuilder. Before optimizing this code, test its performance. You will probably find that there are other bigger bottlenecks to work on first.

The only real comment I have is that your ConcatenateString function seems superfluous. It is not really adding anything to the code and all the call to it can simply be replaced by string.Concat. As mentioned in the answer from @abatishchev, you should be using (str1, str2) not (str1 + str2), as that defeats the reason for the call.

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Like Saxon Druce said: You could use a StringBuilder, but, depending on CodeType values, you could eliminate the switch too:

public string BuildURLAndNavigate(CodeType codeType) 
{  
    StringBuilder vURL = new StringBuilder();

    vURL.Append("http://some.com/nav"); 
    vURL.Append("/somepage.asp?app=myapp"); 

    //Build Code Type 
    vURL.Append(codeType == CodeType.Series ? "&tools=ser" : "&tools=dt");

    //build version  
    string VER_NUM = "5.0"; 
    vURL.AppendFormat("&vsn={0}", VER_NUM);          

    return vURL.ToString(); 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
This might not be the same as eliminitating swicth depending on whether there are more than two values for the enum. It might be that there are values that just don't need to add anything to the url at all. You're probably right but figured it was worth mentioning explicitly. –  Chris Jul 30 '10 at 8:11
    
Yes, I tried to allude to this case in the phrase "depending on CodeType values", but it really deserves to be more explicit, Chris. Thanks! –  Daren Thomas Jul 30 '10 at 8:21

In order to keep all variables at one place, could we use following solution

public string BuildURLAndNavigate(CodeType codeType) 
    {
        //code here - switch statement to calculate the codeValue

        //Anonymous type - To keep all variables at one place    
        var urlComponents = new {
                                server = "http://some.com/nav",
                                pageName="/somepage.asp?app=myapp",
                                codevalue = "", //Replace with the actual value calculated in switch statement
                                versionPart="&vsn=",
                                version = "5.0" 
                                };


        StringBuilder vURL = new StringBuilder();
        vURL.Append(urlComponents.server);
        vURL.Append(urlComponents.pageName);
        vURL.Append(urlComponents.codevalue);
        vURL.Append(urlComponents.versionPart);
        vURL.Append(urlComponents.version);
        return vURL.ToString();

    }
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Yes, StringBuilder is the best solution here. You can find more information on MSDN page: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.text.stringbuilder.aspx

StringBuilder contains very usefull methods:

StringBuilder.Append
Appends information to the end of the current StringBuilder.

StringBuilder.AppendFormat
Replaces a format specifier passed in a string with formatted text.

StringBuilder.Insert
Inserts a string or object into the specified index of the current StringBuilder.

StringBuilder.Remove
Removes a specified number of characters from the current StringBuilder.

StringBuilder.Replace
Replaces a specified character at a specified index.

share|improve this answer
    
URLs shouldn't be treated as plain strings i guess... ... the Uri class is made to handle relative references... –  santa Jul 30 '10 at 7:53

I'd personally be inclined to just string.format something like that:

public string BuildURLAndNavigate(CodeType codeType)
{    
    string vURL = "http://some.com/nav/somepage.asp?app=myapp&tools={0}&vsn={1}"; 
    string codevalue = "";
    //Build Code Type
    switch (codeType)
    {
    case CodeType.Series:
        codevalue = "ser";
        break; 
    case CodeType.DataType:
        codevalue = "dt";
        break;
    }

    //build version 
    string version = "5.0";
    return string.Format(vURL, codevalue, version);
    }
}

Apologies if there are any mistakes in that, I wasn't in VS when writing it so there might be a few typos I didn't notice - you should get the idea though.

The reason I like this method is because you can immediately see what your url's overall form is which can make it a bit easier to understand roughly what the url being returned is.

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